Blogs

Fresh from International Astronomy Show 2016

BBC Sky at Night Magazine reviews editor Paul Money looks at the latest astronomy equipment reviewed in our November issue.

Stephen Tonkin reviews the Altair Astro 100mm giant binoculars in the November issue.
Credit: www.thesecretstudio.net

Making the most of clear skies

Be it long exposures, lengthy set-up times, misbehaving skies or expensive equipment, today's astronomers and astrophotographers have alot to contend with.

BBC Sky at Night Magazine reviews editor Paul Money looks at the latest equipment reviewed in our October issue that is helping astronomers make the most of their observing.

Paul Money reviews the Explore Scientific AR152 doublet achromat refractor in the October issue. View a 360° model of the refractor here.
Credit: www.thesecretstudio.net

Refracting telescopes: room for improvement

BBC Sky at Night Magazine reviews editor Paul Money extols the virtues of technological advancements in September's astronomy equipment reviews.

Our first ever Prima LuceLab review is their incredible AIRY APO120 refractor. View a 360° model at www.skyatnightmagazine.com/airy120apo.
Credit: www.thesecretstudio.net

Judging the IAPY Awards 2016

The judges gather to pick the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year

Editor Chris Bramley looks forward to judging the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year awards with the rest of the adjudicating panel.

Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year judges prepare for a day of debating the best of the year’s astrophotographs in the Endeavour Room.
© National Maritime Museum, London.

A new wave of CCD camera?

This month, BBC Sky at Night Magazine reviews editor Paul Money finds his astro imaging wish may finally have come true.

Is the AST8300-A-M-FW a sign of things to come? You can see a 360° model of the CCD camera at www.skyatnightmagazine.com/ast8300.
Credit: www.thesecretstudio.net

Solar observing beyond white light

BBC Sky at Night Magazine reviews editor Paul Money reveals the kit we're testing in the August issue, including a new set of Calcium H eyepieces that offer solar observing beyond the usual white light.

 

The Quark eyepiece offers views of the sun in the Calcium H wavelength. You can see a 360° model of the filter at www.skyatnightmagazine/quarkcah.

It used to be that viewing and imaging the Sun was a tricky and potentially dangerous affair: indeed, only the most experienced astronomers ventured into the imaging side of things.

Hold steady: the virtues of image stabilising binoculars

Paul Money looks ahead to this month's reviews, featuring Canon's IS binos

BBC Sky at Night Magazine reviews editor Paul Money reveals how image stabilisation has enhanced the power of binoculars.

HowTheLightGetsIn 2016: our top picks

Celebrating the current hot topics in science, art, ethics, language and technology, the HowTheLightGetsIn festival returns to Hay-on-Wye in Hereford for a week of music, food, philosophy and big ideas.

This year's HowTheLightGetsIn festival takes place 26 May to 5 June in the literary town of Hay, and we have scoured the 2016 programme to find out what's in store for those interested in all things cosmic.

The entire programme is available to view at the festival’s website, but take a look below at our personal highlights for 2016.

Pictures from space

ESA's Paolo Nespoli reveals what makes ISS astronauts reach for the camera

ESA's Paolo Nespoli reveals what it is about the view of Earth from the International Space Station that makes astronauts reach for the camera.

DLSR cameras: here to stay?

Paul Money reveals the latest kit reviews appearing in this month's issue

As astrophotography becomes an increasingly popular option for astronomers, DSLR makers are following suit, writes BBC Sky at Night Magazine reviews editor Paul Money.

The D810A is Nikon's first foray into the astronomical DSLR market

The biggest change in astronomy surely has to be the surge of interest in photographing the night sky, especially given how recent advances in the imaging capability of smart phones are enabling almost everyone to try their hand.

So does this mean the end is in sight for the use of DSLRs in astrophotography?

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