'All Sky' Camera

Re: 'All Sky' Camera

Postby Aratus » Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:56 pm

A few new developments - all in the software. I discovered a way to annotate the image with information without doing it across the image. The four corners can be used for that purpose. I've also overlayed a dark blue background, and brown border to the lens. I've also taken off extraneous light from the camera itself, and sources of light pollution by subtracting a 'dark frame'. This is all done using a image library for Python.

Image
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 687
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: 'All Sky' Camera

Postby Aratus » Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:53 pm

Further developments. The camera has been replaced by an earlier PiCamera 'modded' with a proper all-sky lens. (modmypi) The camera unit has now been elevated above the observatory dome, and due to some forestry work to my west, I can now see the sunset! The camera continues to be useful in monitoring the skies. :D
Image

The only problem now is that it takes a step ladder to bring it down, and wiping/cleaning the transparent dome is a major operation. Tip-toes with a paper towel no longer does it. :(
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 687
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: 'All Sky' Camera

Postby EIZO » Wed Dec 13, 2017 12:13 pm

I admire people who try different things but i don't think I will bother
Celestron Edge 8" Evolution, Esprit 120mm triplet, Sky Tee2, William Optics Binoviewers, many 2" eyepieces. Nikon D4s, D810, Nikkor 70-200 F2.8, 14-24, 70-200, Sigma 150-600 Sport, Gitzo tripods
EIZO
 
Posts: 156
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2017 9:09 pm

Re: 'All Sky' Camera

Postby Aratus » Wed Dec 13, 2017 6:03 pm

EIZO wrote:I admire people who try different things but i don't think I will bother


Thank you. For me it is great help, and well worth the effort in making it work. I can monitor when the sky clears from inside the house, and get outside at the first opportunity. It beats having to get up, go outside and check the sky every so often. This way I can see tell the very moment the cloud has cleared from the comfort of a desk or even my armchair. We get precious little clear sky time, and this way I can maximise every minute.

While I'm in the observatory I can see little of the sky, and this camera warns me when cloud is approaching. For instance, it enables me to decide if it is worth doing a long series of exposures, or not. If it does cloud over, I can go inside and check what happens next while I do something else. It beats standing outside in the cold waiting for the cloud to clear.

As an added bonus it will record a bright meteor or bright satellite/ ISS passing over. Also various atmospheric phenomena like sun arcs, moon arcs/rings, alpen-glow and good old rainbows and even lightening.

There is also the satisfaction of constructing something yourself, and learning new skills.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 687
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Previous

Return to Astro imaging

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests