binoculars

Ask your fellow astronomers to solve your telescope queries

binoculars

Postby wyllie67 » Sat Feb 11, 2017 4:48 pm

Hi all,
Just joined and interested in starting some stargazing. I've read online that is best to start of with good binoculars then move onto telescopes.
Can anyone suggest a good pair of binoculars for stargazing?
I have looked myself and came across "Helios Fieldmaster 10x50 Binoculars" and "Helios Fieldmaster 7x50 Binoculars" but again as Im new I don't know if any of these are suitable.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.thanks
wyllie67
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2017 8:28 pm

Re: binoculars

Postby Aratus » Sat Feb 11, 2017 5:24 pm

Size of lens is more important than magnification. Helios is a good make. Check out their 'nature-sport plus' 10 x 50, which has had good reviews recently

I have a Celestron 10x50 which is a good size for spotting star clusters, asteroids and comets. Brighter galaxies and nebula are visible too. I think a 7 x 50 is better for carrying around, but I prefer a 10x50.

I do have a 15 x 70, but it is too heavy for general astronomical use. They can be used with a tripod but you still have to crick your neck to view anything at altitude. I keep them for looking at ships which stay comfortably on the horizon! :D
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 807
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: binoculars

Postby Gfamily2 » Sat Feb 11, 2017 8:13 pm

If the weather is fine, you can put a sleeping mat on the floor and use heavier binoculars (like the 15 x 70 bins) in a supine position, which should cover you for objects with altitude down to about 60 degrees.
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak, Raffle winner of SW ST80
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
For companionship: Mid Cheshire Astronomical Group.
(Not a moderator)
Gfamily2
 
Posts: 452
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2015 10:38 pm

Re: binoculars

Postby Aratus » Sun Feb 12, 2017 3:41 pm

I also find that reclining is the only way to observe anything (with binoculars) at altitude, for any length of time. It is a lot of fun lying out under the stars on a reclining seat in the middle of August looking at the Milky Way. However, even in August, most of the time you need a blanket. There are some exceptionally mild nights - very occasionally. . .
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 807
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: binoculars

Postby wyllie67 » Wed Feb 15, 2017 11:16 pm

Thanks for the help guys! Were would you find reputable shops that's sell gd equipment either on-line or in store?
wyllie67
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2017 8:28 pm

Re: binoculars

Postby dave.b » Tue Feb 28, 2017 10:09 pm

Plenty of adverts in the magazines. Otherwise internet search with a filter for UK vendors. eBay doesn't count.
dave.b
 
Posts: 797
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 6:35 pm
Location: Staffordshire

Re: binoculars

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Sun Mar 19, 2017 1:42 am

I use 15x70s but I'm a big bloke with steady hands. I think 10x50s are better for beginners.
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

My website: http://www.philippughastronomer.com/

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 1:53 pm
Location: Wiltshire but can be just about anywhere up to 41 000 feet

Re: binoculars

Postby gneiss » Tue Mar 28, 2017 2:17 pm

I use Celestron Skymaster 12 x 60 which are a good compromise between weight and aperture...

I have some Bushnell Trophy 8 x 56 Binoculars too which are far better built but also considerably heavier. My wife has a smaller 12 x 42 version of the Trophy Binoculars for general use, but they slill work quite well for astronomy if nothing else is to hand.
gneiss
 
Posts: 491
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 6:31 pm


Return to Equipment Advice

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests