Blast from the past

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Blast from the past

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Sat Jan 05, 2019 10:28 am

#TheMoon April 26th 2013:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippug ... ed-public/

127mm Maksutov and DSLR at prime focus.
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

About Me: https://www.amazon.com/Philip-Pugh/e/B0034NTCJK

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
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Location: Wiltshire but can be just about anywhere up to 41 000 feet

Re: Blast from the past

Postby Aratus » Sat Jan 05, 2019 12:25 pm

It shows the bright crater Aristarchus so well. The crater wall is like a mirror reflecting the light from the sun back at the earth. My earliest photo through a telescope was of the Beehive Cluster from about 1990. It wouldn't be worth showing though! :D It was slide film back in those days. I had no idea it was out of focus until it came back from the processors. :(
I use an 11" reflector (Celestron CPC 1100) and a 3" refractor, (Sky-Watcher ST80) mounted on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI 120MM, ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 1300D for imaging.
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Re: Blast from the past

Postby Gfamily2 » Sat Jan 05, 2019 1:38 pm

This is probably my oldest astro image, the 2004 transit of Venus
Transit.jpg
Transit.jpg (29.84 KiB) Viewed 782 times
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak, Raffle winner of SW ST80
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
For companionship: Mid Cheshire Astronomical Group.
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Re: Blast from the past

Postby Aratus » Sat Jan 05, 2019 3:36 pm

Great photo of the transit. I remember it well, which is as well, because I'll never see one again. ;)

The first photo I took, which I'll happily admit to is this one of Jupiter taken using a Practika film camera with 400 ASA slide film. It was taken through a Beacon Hill 6" Newtonian reflector. 12th April 1991 at 2030.

Image

The original image is in the corner, but with a few clicks of the mouse and the pink cast is gone, and the contrast brings out the features.

At that time I was using a Commodore 128 with GEOS operating sytem. I had a dot matrix printer and a 7" floppy. The idea of digital photos was way, way off . . .
I use an 11" reflector (Celestron CPC 1100) and a 3" refractor, (Sky-Watcher ST80) mounted on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI 120MM, ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 1300D for imaging.
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Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: Blast from the past

Postby Graeme1858 » Sun Jan 06, 2019 12:30 am

Ok, here's my first go attempt. About 2012ish. Mobile phone held to the eyepiece of my 10" dob.
Attachments
Jupiter.png
Jupiter.png (275.79 KiB) Viewed 753 times
_______________________________________
Miranda 10x50 Binoculars
Celestron CGX 9.25" SCT
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Re: Blast from the past

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Sun Jan 06, 2019 1:18 am

My first ever astro shot was the Moon on Dec 31st 2003. I never shot astro using film.
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

About Me: https://www.amazon.com/Philip-Pugh/e/B0034NTCJK

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof
 
Posts: 548
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 1:53 pm
Location: Wiltshire but can be just about anywhere up to 41 000 feet

Re: Blast from the past

Postby Aratus » Sun Jan 06, 2019 5:41 pm

I guess I ought to let you see my first photo - the Beehive Cluster which I said I wouldn't let you see! This was a prime focus using a home made adapter through my then new 6" reflector. I guided it through the small spotter scope back in 1991. Unfortunately I got the focusing wrong. It is very hard to focus on a dim object like this. Those old ground glass screens were OK for daytime photos, but of course you saw nothing on it with something as dim as this. What I should have done is focussed it on a very bright star, or the moon, first, and then moved it over to the dimmer object. (Good advice) It is slide film again.

Image

In a sense we are giving a false impression by only showing our best photos taken after years of experience. We all have to start somewhere, and we all make mistakes. People should keep trying, and not be put off by disappointing results.
I use an 11" reflector (Celestron CPC 1100) and a 3" refractor, (Sky-Watcher ST80) mounted on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI 120MM, ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 1300D for imaging.
Aratus
 
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Re: Blast from the past

Postby Aratus » Tue Jan 08, 2019 2:33 pm

In 1992 I experimented with taking video through the telescope and eyepiece. Bear in mind that video cameras in those days where either on tripods or on your shoulder! The idea was to play the tape back and freeze on the best frame. That meant that descriptions could be written at leisure - in the warmth. Also drawings could be made, and even traced from the TV screen. What was not possible then was to save the image digitally or print it out. The VHS standard was no better than 240 lines, so the resolution wasn't brilliant either. However, it did keep an interesting, permanent record of the observing session.
Those old video tapes can now be digitised, and it is possible to use them to ilustrate the log. They can also be stacked to give better resolution, and more like the view originally seen.
The system was limited to the moon and the brighter planets, but it was the start of using CCD for astronomy.
Here is one example. The Altai Scarp is in centre. The image was take with a Newtonian reflector, and the therefore the south is 'up'.
Image
I use an 11" reflector (Celestron CPC 1100) and a 3" refractor, (Sky-Watcher ST80) mounted on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI 120MM, ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 1300D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 944
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: Blast from the past

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Wed Jan 09, 2019 6:30 pm

Aratus wrote:In 1992 I experimented with taking video through the telescope and eyepiece. Bear in mind that video cameras in those days where either on tripods or on your shoulder! The idea was to play the tape back and freeze on the best frame. That meant that descriptions could be written at leisure - in the warmth. Also drawings could be made, and even traced from the TV screen. What was not possible then was to save the image digitally or print it out. The VHS standard was no better than 240 lines, so the resolution wasn't brilliant either. However, it did keep an interesting, permanent record of the observing session.
Those old video tapes can now be digitised, and it is possible to use them to ilustrate the log. They can also be stacked to give better resolution, and more like the view originally seen.
The system was limited to the moon and the brighter planets, but it was the start of using CCD for astronomy.
Here is one example. The Altai Scarp is in centre. The image was take with a Newtonian reflector, and the therefore the south is 'up'.
Image


Were you trailblazing here?
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

About Me: https://www.amazon.com/Philip-Pugh/e/B0034NTCJK

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof
 
Posts: 548
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 1:53 pm
Location: Wiltshire but can be just about anywhere up to 41 000 feet

Re: Blast from the past

Postby Aratus » Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:01 pm

I think others must have been trying out similar things at the time, but there was no easy way of communicating in those days. The video camera was one I bought was new - but an old model even in 1992. They knocked down the price to get rid of them. (It was similar to the one seen in 'Back to the Future'!) It did have one advantage in that the CCD was a large one, and the tapes it used were full size VHS. It gave the best quality possible. The idea of digitising and stacking images was fantasy in those days, but stacking and resampling the video, along with the wavelet processing creates images that were similar to what was seen through the telescope at the time. In January 1993, Mars was bright and very well placed. The image I got from that is exactly as I remember it, and as described in my log.
Image

Perhaps we all ought to keep our original images taken today. Who knows what we might be able to do with them in 25 years time!
I use an 11" reflector (Celestron CPC 1100) and a 3" refractor, (Sky-Watcher ST80) mounted on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI 120MM, ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 1300D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 944
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

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