Celestron 130 slt

Got a beginners' question? No matter how elementary, our friendly forum community and magazine writers will answer it.

Celestron 130 slt

Postby pr9spk » Mon Oct 31, 2016 8:04 pm

So I read the reviews and bought a Celestron 130 SLT.

A couple of questions:

1. When using the eyepieces, I am getting frustrated. I find that if I am 1mm too close to the eyepiece, I can see nothing, if I am 1mm too far away I can just see black. I have to maneuver my head into exactly the right place to see what I am looking at, it is very annoying. Are all telescopes like this?

2. So far I have just seen some bright stars, like Vega, Capella, Arcturus, Polaris etc. These appear as a piercing tiny white dot in the eyepiece. The only other thing I have tried was M110, which was a barely visible VERY FAINT pale grey smudge against the blackness. Not very inspiring. To be honest, the scope isn't a huge improvement over my Bresser binoculars.

Am I doing something wrong?
pr9spk
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2016 11:17 am

Re: Celestron 130 slt

Postby Aratus » Mon Oct 31, 2016 9:03 pm

Regarding 1. This seems to me to be an issue of 'eye relief'. This is the distance from the lens you need to be to see the widest image. The higher the magnification, the shorter the eye relief, so using lower magnification can help. Spectacle wearers and/or people with eyesight problems might have extra problems with this. Discussing this with an optician might give a solution. Otherwise it is an issue we have to live with.

Regarding 2. Your telescope seems to be working as it should. Stars will simply look brighter in a telescope. However, telescopes can reveal companion stars if a star is a multiple star. Check out Polaris in that respect. M110 is exactly as you describe it; it isn't a good example. Try checking out brighter objects like M34 or M15. Telescopes come into their own looking at planets or small objects like M1 or M27. Binoculars and telescope compliment each other.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 812
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: Celestron 130 slt

Postby pr9spk » Sat Dec 03, 2016 10:28 pm

I've been looking at lots of dots and smudges. Would an upgrade to a quality refractor allow me to discern more detail?
pr9spk
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2016 11:17 am

Re: Celestron 130 slt

Postby Aratus » Sun Dec 04, 2016 2:56 pm

I think, apart from the moon and planets, a lot of astronomy is 'dots and smudges'. :) If you want more detail, then you need a larger (bigger aperture) telescope. One way to do this without breaking the bank is to concentrate on the telescope, and go for a cheap mounting. A 'Dobsonian' telescope takes this approach. You need to know your way around the sky though. The other way is to use a camera and long exposures through a normal telescope, which can imitate a telescope of a much larger size. Astrophotography requires learning though.

Refractors are good for slightly better planetary and lunar detail. It won't give you the kind of improvement that I think you are after.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 812
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: Celestron 130 slt

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Fri Dec 23, 2016 8:31 pm

I use my binoculars more for browsing deep sky objects and my 127mm Maksutov for solar system objects. I use a focal reducer with my Mak to obtain a field of view of about 2 degrees with the Mak. That and a light pollution reduction filter enabled me to "catch" all of the Messier objects. This should also be attainable with a Celestron 130 SLT.
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

My website: http://www.philippughastronomer.com/

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 1:53 pm
Location: Wiltshire but can be just about anywhere up to 41 000 feet


Return to Ask a silly (astronomy) question

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests