Hello all

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Hello all

Postby Chewie2309 » Wed May 16, 2018 10:11 pm

Hi my name is John and I’m trying to get into astronomy I have got a scope a celestron nexstar 4se but it seems the more I read the more complicated it gets ,I’ve been out a couple of times but as of yet not seen anything I wish I knew someone who lived close by because at the moment I’m lost .I won’t give up because it’s something I’ve wanted to do for years but never had the time I live in wigan Lancashire ,my garden is small but pretty dark anyway I’ll keep you posted on how I get on and thanks for reading .
Chewie2309
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed May 16, 2018 10:02 pm

Re: Hello all

Postby Zippy » Fri May 18, 2018 10:47 pm

Hi John,
Welcome to the forum. Sometimes things can be a bit slow and you may have to wait a little while to get a response, but there are some guys here with huge experience that can point you in right direction.
I am also a newbie and have learned more in one month than I did in the previous 50 years. There is an immense amount of information available. I went to the public library and went through their Astronomy section. Chose 2 books, one being Constellations by Giles Sparrow and the other is Wonders Of The Solar System by Brian Cox. I also purchased 2018 Stargazing Guide from The Works for £3 as it tells you what is the best thing to concentrate on each month.
Zippy
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2018 11:24 pm

Re: Hello all

Postby Zippy » Fri May 18, 2018 11:10 pm

The moon has to be a good place to practice on for a week or so during the month, but right now you should checkout Jupiter while it is still so close to us. Just look due south in the late evening and it will be the brightest thing in the southern sky, sitting a little above the horizon. I was pleasantly surprised to discover that a standard pair of 10x50 binoculars can not only show Jupiter, but it's 4 Galilean Moons orbiting it too.
A few weeks ago I could not identify a single star or constellation in the sky. I had no perception of what field of view a constellation would take up. So I got the maps out and started with Polaris, the North Star that appears to never move. As it is part of Ursa Minor you can quickly work out that constellation. Then having that one in the bag as a reference, move on to Ursa Major, which is Huge. The Plough is part of this Constellation and the last 2 stars of the Plough always point towards Polaris. Learn these 2 constellations and you always have a reference when searching the Northern Sky.
Zippy
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2018 11:24 pm

Re: Hello all

Postby Zippy » Fri May 18, 2018 11:41 pm

If you live in a populated area, the chances are that you live within 15 miles of an Astronomy Club.
Most valuable for picking peoples brain but also for checking out other members equipment too.
You said that you could see nothing.
First you need to make sure your equipment is functioning OK. Read your book that should tell you how to check your scope's Collimation. This can be set up in the day time. Also in the daytime you need to set up your Finder Scope. Point your scope at a target 100m or more away and set your view finders cross-hair to match the centre of what your scope is seeing.
Then when you have a clear night sky you are ready to play. If there are no clouds you should be able to see a lot of stars with your naked eye. If you can't you have a serious problem with light pollution. If so, the only solution might be to relocate. Once you have picked a star/object you position your scope using your finder scope. Then you switch to viewing through your telescope, but always start on the lowest magnification. Do not fall into the trap of using Barlow lenses or powerful eyepieces unless absolutely necessary. Most of the experienced guys will operate with relatively low magnifications and that is with high quality kit. The standard accessories supplied with most scopes tend not to be that high quality. So the higher magnifying pieces tend to introduce much more distortion with the magnification. You often see much better detail in smaller images.
Hope this is of help to get you going.
Feel free to ask if you are still stuck.
Kind regards, George.
Zippy
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2018 11:24 pm

Re: Hello all

Postby Zippy » Fri May 18, 2018 11:47 pm

If this posts I will be over joyed as until now I have not been able to list Web pages here.

To find a club near to you checkout this page
http://www.astronomyclubs.co.uk/Clubs/Counties.aspx
Zippy
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2018 11:24 pm


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