Just got a telescope for Xmas!!

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Just got a telescope for Xmas!!

Postby smalls898 » Fri Dec 28, 2018 2:55 am

Help!!! I just got an Orion SpaceProbe 2 76mm. It took me 2 hours to align the scope and it was perfectly aligned. I finally found the “star” which I believe to be a satellite in my eyepiece and it was just a clarified version of the naked eye??? I set up everything for this scope exactly to directions??? It was a kit and came with a 25mm, a 10mm and then the Barstow lens, I put them all in and the object never changed??? Help!!!
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Re: Just got a telescope for Xmas!!

Postby Graeme1858 » Fri Dec 28, 2018 8:55 am

They take a bit of getting used to! Try using it during the day so you're not struggling with it in the dark. Don't point it at the sun, you'll go blind. What is your best direction for looking without trees and houses in the way in your back garden after dark?
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Re: Just got a telescope for Xmas!!

Postby Gfamily2 » Fri Dec 28, 2018 11:04 am

Graeme1858 wrote:They take a bit of getting used to! Try using it during the day so you're not struggling with it in the dark. Don't point it at the sun, you'll go blind. What is your best direction for looking without trees and houses in the way in your back garden after dark?

Individual stars are so small that they don't look any different through a telescope; but there are many other targets you can look at, which will be much more satisfying.
Star Clusters - such as the Pleiades (7 Sisters) or the Hyades in Taurus, or the Double cluster in Perseus.
Nebulas such as the Orion Nebula are worth looking at.

A good book to start with, is Turn Left at Orion which has a good selection of targets to try for with the Naked Eye, Binoculars and a small Telescope.

You can use a Planisphere or a cheap telephone app such as Stellarium or Sky Safari (or Google Sky as a free alternative) to help you know where to look for them.

You might also find it worth checking out if there are any local astronomy societies, as they can help you locate local places with particularly dark skies etc, which can really help.
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak, Raffle winner of SW ST80
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
For companionship: Mid Cheshire Astronomical Group.
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Re: Just got a telescope for Xmas!!

Postby Aratus » Fri Dec 28, 2018 11:08 am

smalls898 wrote:Help!!! I just got an Orion SpaceProbe 2 76mm. It took me 2 hours to align the scope and it was perfectly aligned. I finally found the “star” which I believe to be a satellite in my eyepiece and it was just a clarified version of the naked eye??? I set up everything for this scope exactly to directions??? It was a kit and came with a 25mm, a 10mm and then the Barstow lens, I put them all in and the object never changed??? Help!!!


I'm not familiar with this telescope so I had to look it up. It is a 3" Newtonian reflector with an alt/azimuth mount.

Firstly an alt/azimuth mount doesn't need aligning. You point it at the object and view. It is the simplist of mounts. The down side is that the rotation of the earth will take the object out of view in a minute or two. To get around that you just move the mount slightly every so often to keep the object in view.

There are a great number of stars, and the vast majority of them are stars. (A satellite will give itself away by moving.) Stars are so far away that even the largest telescope with only reveal a point of light. It will be brighter, that's all. You may detect some colour with a telescope. You may find that what appears to be a single star with your eye does in fact consist of several stars. Otherwise there will be no change. What you have reported is exactly what you would expect to see.

What you need to do is to learn your way around the sky and discover where various objects are. (The moon is a good one to start with! :) ) The 'Sky at Night' magazine gives plenty of direction as to objects that can be seen. Simply pointing the telescope at star after star randomly will disappoint. You could get a good book on the subject, or an electronic equivalent.
I use an 11" reflector (Celestron CPC 1100) and a 3" refractor, (Sky-Watcher ST80) mounted on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI 120MM, ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 1300D for imaging.
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