Light pollution - the good, the bad and the ugly

A place to discuss the dreaded orange glow

RE: Light pollution - the good, the bad and the ugly

Postby tddun » Tue Jul 13, 2010 1:43 am

Slightly off topic but looking at that picture of Orion.. when it's vertical like that I always think of it looking kind of like a space shuttle.
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RE: Light pollution - the good, the bad and the ugly

Postby sftonkin » Fri Aug 13, 2010 1:33 pm

You may find this to be of use:
[url=http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/quality/local/legislation/cnea/documents/statnuisance.pdf]http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/quality/local/legislation/cnea/documents/statnuisance.pdf[/url]
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RE: Light pollution - the good, the bad and the ugly

Postby tooth_dr » Fri Aug 13, 2010 2:06 pm

30s exposure from last night out the back, which is my least light polluted area! At least my LP is almost entirely orange street lighting, so I can use a CLS LP filter to remove a lot of it.

Image
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RE: Light pollution - the good, the bad and the ugly

Postby fifelad55 » Wed Sep 01, 2010 8:06 am

I live in a condo in Thailand so any observing has to be done from the condo roof. The light pollution where I stay is severe with a limiting visual magnitude that varies from as bad as 1.5 to about 3.5 at best. Polaris lies 13 degrees above the northern horizon but is totally invisible to the naked eye and can only be seen through binoculars.

Even when the Pleaiades are virtually overhead, only about 2 of its stars can be seen with the number visible through binoculars varying from about 8 to around 20 or so. However, there is a bonus in that Alpha Centauri and Canopus amongst others can be seen easily.

Alan
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RE: Light pollution - the good, the bad and the ugly

Postby ciprian » Fri Sep 24, 2010 9:43 am

I used to live south of Cleveland, OH when I started to get interested in astronomy.
My observation site was exposed to some white light so "dark adaptation" was not possible. However, I was able to see quite a few Messier objects out there.
I've returned to Seattle, WA last year and I've expected worse conditions. But it was the other way.
My backyard provides a place shielded from white light. It's in a red zone light polution location (Bellevue to south and downtown Seattle to SW) and there are quite a few high trees close by (including one in my own yard that shades half of the sky in my prefered observation location). The chainsaw is close by and the tree will get a trimming in the next few months [:D]
I get some decent sky exposure to E and N. S is affected by light polution but at least I can still see a few objects out there.

Overall, I think it's not so bad as long as I can still see stars up to magnitude 4.5 without any visual aid.
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RE: Light pollution - the good, the bad and the ugly

Postby Boodlewoodle » Sat Sep 25, 2010 11:46 pm

Seeing the problem others are facing the 8 street lights that remain on all night long at the back of my house dont seem so bad. However what I would like to ask the council is why on earth do they have to be on all night? I know for a fact that if they went off at 12pm it would not make the slightest bit of difference. People say that criminals would be encouraged when all the houses have dirty great spot lights that come on when a cat walks past why do we need them? It may be necessary in some areas for sure but where I live there is no good reason for it and its is just a waste of tax payers money. I have considered resorting to a ladder and a bin bag I'm so fed up with them. When I was a kid my parents would keep saying to me turn the lights off when you go to bed, dont leave those lights on it costs money. Shame the councils dont take that advice! Time to move to the country side!
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RE: Light pollution - the good, the bad and the ugly

Postby rmackenz » Sun Sep 26, 2010 3:06 am


[quote]ORIGINAL: nightowl

Seeing the problem others are facing the 8 street lights that remain on all night long at the back of my house dont seem so bad. However what I would like to ask the council is why on earth do they have to be on all night? I know for a fact that if they went off at 12pm it would not make the slightest bit of difference. People say that criminals would be encouraged when all the houses have dirty great spot lights that come on when a cat walks past why do we need them? It may be necessary in some areas for sure but where I live there is no good reason for it and its is just a waste of tax payers money. I have considered resorting to a ladder and a bin bag I'm so fed up with them. When I was a kid my parents would keep saying to me turn the lights off when you go to bed, dont leave those lights on it costs money. Shame the councils dont take that advice! Time to move to the country side!
[/quote]

They turn off every second streetlight where i live at 24.00 every night and the rest one hour later but we just had an election and the winning party wants to have them all turned on until the sun rise :(
I can't even remember hearing about any break-ins or other crimes around my area, i'm thinking about sending them a letter or something saying they could at least turn off every second light or change to better ones that's more power efficient and face down against the pavement.
At least it's not as bad as some other examples i've seen in this thread, i feel sorry for you.

I voted for another party :)
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RE: Light pollution - the good, the bad and the ugly

Postby fifelad55 » Mon Sep 27, 2010 5:26 pm

I do any observing from my condo roof, where the ambient light is such that I don't need a torch to see where I'm walking.

Apart from floodlights on other nearby condos, there are 5 floodlights situated just below the top of the roof, though I can generally hide them without too much trouble.

Then, if the light pollution to the north wasn't bad enough, there are often a number of spotlights sweeping across the sky! And, soon I'll have to contend with UFL's (Unidentified Flying Lanterns) which are orange in colour and are set aloft for the Thai festival of Loy Khratong, which this year is towards the end of November. In addition, there are the inevitable fireworks which are set off at all hours! The lanterns and fireworks continue after Loy Khratong to mark the King's birthday in early December. Then, they continue until the New Year (western and Chinese)!

Polaris is about 13 degrees above the northern horizon where I am and it is absolutely impossible to see with the naked eye. Even finding it with binoculars is just about impossible unless Ursa Major is above the horizon. At present, it starts to rise just before the Sun!

I do, however, have the bonus that even at 3.30 am, I can observe in shorts and t-shirt at any time of year.

Alan
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RE: Light pollution - the good, the bad and the ugly

Postby wayner » Fri Dec 17, 2010 7:00 pm

I've posted this on the East Devon thread, but Newport (South Wales) are starting a partial switch off from midnight to 05:30.
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RE: Light pollution - the good, the bad and the ugly

Postby hallaig » Thu Dec 30, 2010 6:23 pm

I had trouble with a street light out side my place so with a ladder and black paint in hand my side of the light does,nt
bother me enymore kryton
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