M27 - the dumbbell nebula

Post your latest observations, sketches or astro images here

M27 - the dumbbell nebula

Postby Aratus » Wed Jul 26, 2017 5:25 pm

The 'dumbbell' is a good 'August' object but I thought I would try a bit early this year. Messier 27 is actually quite bright and in a dark sky can be seen with the naked eye. However on this occasion the lighter sky made it harder to locate. I took 2 x 45sec exposures and combined them to give this image. ( I also experimented with some longer guided exposures - the least said about the better! )

Image

It needs a lot more exposures, longer exposures, and possibly some filters to bring out the reds and yellows I know are in the nebula, but it's a start.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: M27 - the dumbbell nebula

Postby andrewscomputers » Fri Jul 28, 2017 11:24 am

Hi Aratus you are doing better than me,I put my scope out and it clouds over and even if it is partially clear it still stops me seeing DSO at the moment, hopefully it will get better in the future.Also is there any tips to help me find them when it is quite light at the moment at night.
Andy
andrewscomputers
 
Posts: 189
Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:24 pm

Re: M27 - the dumbbell nebula

Postby Aratus » Fri Jul 28, 2017 12:24 pm

The trick with M27 is to locate the constellation 'Sagitta' - the arrow. It is a small, but quite distinctive constellation. From the star marking the tip of the arrow go upwards at right angles with the arrow 'shaft'. M27 is the equivalent of about half the length of the arrow in that direction. Sagitta is inside the 'summer triangle' towards the Altair corner. In a week or two the sky will be significantly darker at a reasonable hour in the late evening.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: M27 - the dumbbell nebula

Postby andrewscomputers » Fri Jul 28, 2017 1:38 pm

Hi Aratus thanks for the reply,I caught the dumbbell once in June,but goto tells me I am only 0.01 degree out but cannot see,but I think is because it still is light at midnight and I can still see my garden.
Andy
andrewscomputers
 
Posts: 189
Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:24 pm

Re: M27 - the dumbbell nebula

Postby Aratus » Fri Jul 28, 2017 7:06 pm

At one time I had a 'closed season' between the end of May and the 12th August. (The 'glorious twelveth' being the Perseid meteor shower of course!) I simply didn't bother beyween those dates. I'm less strict about these matters now. (or is it impatience!) At the moment there is no technical 'night' at all, but by the 12th August astronomical twight starts at about 11:15pm at my location.

When I took the above photo I couldn't see M27 at all through the finderscope, although it was faintly visible through my 80mm refractor.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: M27 - the dumbbell nebula

Postby andrewscomputers » Fri Jul 28, 2017 7:35 pm

Hi Aratus I will just have to wait for darker nights,but on the 6th June I did see m57,M27,M5,M13 and finally M81.I think I had a good night but have not had many since because high pressure was in charge over my location.
Andy
andrewscomputers
 
Posts: 189
Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:24 pm

Re: M27 - the dumbbell nebula

Postby Aratus » Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:14 pm

I was able to image the 'Dumbbell' with the new camera, last night (15th). There is a lot to get used to including things called 'darks', and a mysterious thing called 'Debayering'! The mount is still slowly moving the telescope upwards, which leads to trails, but I was able to successfully 'track' the image manually. It is interesting to compare this image with the one taken by the Canon. (above) Both are 45 sec exposures. This one uses a CLS filter which is a basic light pollution filter. The Canon filtered out a lot of the nebula light out with its own built in daylight filter.

Image
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: M27 - the dumbbell nebula

Postby andrewscomputers » Thu Aug 17, 2017 11:02 am

Hi Aratus I like the image,what happened to your old camera,they take a bit of getting used to the new ones as I found out when I just bought a colour gpcam 290c and am still learning when I can get a clear sky.
Andy
andrewscomputers
 
Posts: 189
Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:24 pm

Re: M27 - the dumbbell nebula

Postby Aratus » Thu Aug 17, 2017 4:21 pm

I'm afraid that 6 years of plugging the mini-usb lead in and out of the Canon DSLR must have taken its toll. For several months the connection has been intermittant, but now the PC refuses to recognise it. The Canon camera still works as an ordinary camera, but I can no longer control it from the laptop. The ZWO ASI1600MC is essentially the same size sensor as the Canon, but as a CCD camera it is a lot more primitive than a DSLR. It only gives out 'raw' images, and it requires manual processing to get an workable image. It also needs a USB 3 port, rather than the USB 2 which worked happily with the Canon. Potentially it should be able to yield better images, but there is a lot to learn. Keep trying with your camera too. It takes time, but we will soon be experts!
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: M27 - the dumbbell nebula

Postby andrewscomputers » Thu Aug 17, 2017 4:31 pm

Hi Aratus I now how it feels as my laptop is about six years old and still using xp,I think we will be both be experts one day as CMOS technology as it has only been out on these cameras for a few years and there is not alot of information on the sensors especially sony.I thought I would give this camera a go as it is 1/2 8mm and is intended for my telescope as my mono cam was only 1/3,to give me more of Fov.
Thanks
Andy
andrewscomputers
 
Posts: 189
Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:24 pm

Next

Return to Your astro observations, images & sketches

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests