Moons Go Round Planets

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Moons Go Round Planets

Postby gordyb » Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:40 pm

Planets go round Suns,The Sun in the Orion Arm goes round the Milky Way,could the Local Group of Galaxies go around anything Cosmic Strings??,and could even Universes circle some incredible massive body which goes beyond our comprehension.
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RE: Moons Go Round Planets

Postby worcspaul » Tue Sep 21, 2010 10:36 am

As I understand it, Andromeda and the Milky Way are heading towards each other. Computer modelling predicts that when galaixies meet, they (or, rather, the stars within) engage in an elaborate "dance", possibly rotating around a common centre of gravity. The September Extra edition of the Jodrell Bank podcast at [url=http://www.jodcast.net/archive/201009Extra/]www.jodcast.net[/url] includes, as a reply to an "ask an astronomer" question, a fascinating description of the expansion of the universe.
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RE: Moons Go Round Planets

Postby lancashire astroguy » Sun Oct 17, 2010 11:53 am


[quote]ORIGINAL: gordyb

Planets go round Suns,The Sun in the Orion Arm goes round the Milky Way,could the Local Group of Galaxies go around anything Cosmic Strings??,and could even Universes circle some incredible massive body which goes beyond our comprehension.
[/quote]


The Local Group of galaxies (including the Milky Way and Andromeda) are gravitationally bound to the Virgo cluster of galaxies, and could be considered a satellite of Virgo. Virgo and other nearby clusters and groups together constitute the Local or "Virgo" supercluster of galaxies (LSC). The LSC and other nearby superclusters are themselves being pulled with a velocity of around 600km per second towards a distant concentration of mass known as the Great Attractor. The Great Attractor is around 200 million light years away, and is rather annoyingly obscured by the disk of our own Milky Way. However, it is likely just a huge supercluster, or a filament of superclusters. Beyond the Great Attractor lie similar enormous structures, including vast filaments and voids. Such is the hierarchical nature of the structure of the Universe!

Could the Universe be orbiting another more massive Universe? Well not in the usual meaning of the term "orbit" I would think. However, some cosmological theories view the Universe in interesting ways. One hypothesis sees the Universe as a 4 dimensional membrane moving through 11 dimensional space. In this (highly speculative) theory it was an interaction between our Universe and another 4 dimensional membrane which formed the Big Bang.

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