New to Astronomy with Heritage 130p

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New to Astronomy with Heritage 130p

Postby balakm279 » Mon Oct 03, 2016 11:14 am

Hi.. I am new to Astronomy although been very interested for a very long time.. Got my first telescope a SkyWatcher 130p Hertiage last week and have had very little success with just 2 clear sky nights.. I used the Night Sky 2 app on my phone to find the position of mars last night which I could also see as a speck of orange glow in the sky with naked eyes.. I tried the 25" eye piece as well as the 10" eye piece which came with the telescop and all I got was a enhanced orangish spec on my eye piece. No matter how much I tried to focus could not get more than that.. I tried to take a pic of what I saw on my phone.. is this what I can expect to see with the default kit? would buying a 2x barlow improve? I am waiting for the moon to make an appearance so that I can observe something in close!

P.S : Unable to add a picture on my first post!
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Re: New to Astronomy with Heritage 130p

Postby Aratus » Mon Oct 03, 2016 2:28 pm

Hello! I'm sorry, but the system doesn't let you do certain things until you've a dozen or so posts under your belt!

Mars is one of the worst planets to observe in that it is quite small. It only gets large enough to be interesting for a few weeks every 2 years. At the moment it has gone past its best, and it is very low down anyway. The 2 eyepieces you have won't give the maximum usable magnification with your telescope. Generally speaking a barlow will help for planetary viewing, but with Mars at the moment you are only likely to get a larger 'orange speck'! It is unfortunate that there are no bright planets prominent in the sky at the moment. Saturn is low down in the west just as it gets dark.

The moon starts to become an interesting evening object from tonight (3rd) for the next couple of weeks. There are plenty of other objects to see which don't require great magnifications. The Pleiades and the Andromeda Galaxy in the east. Uranus and Neptune are around in the south. There are lots of double stars and star clusters too. Check out the magazine for things to look at.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
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Re: New to Astronomy with Heritage 130p

Postby balakm279 » Mon Oct 03, 2016 3:13 pm

Yeah I figured it won't let me post the links yet. Yeah hoping for a view of the moon tonight. I found a site time and date which says what is the likeliness of spotting a planet on the night sky..
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Re: New to Astronomy with Heritage 130p

Postby balakm279 » Thu Oct 06, 2016 2:44 pm

Right I managed to spot Neptune yesterday night and I was disappointed yet again.. Earlier I had a look at the Crescent moon and it looked fabulous and I can't wait to see it again.. I am attaching an image of Neptune I could see on my 25mm lens.. it was not any better in the 10mm either.. I have ordered for a 2X barlow and a 6mm eyepiece today so hoping they will be helpful..
Attachments
IMG_3177.PNG
IMG_3177.PNG (233.31 KiB) Viewed 2527 times
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Re: New to Astronomy with Heritage 130p

Postby Gfamily2 » Fri Oct 07, 2016 1:10 am

To be honest, it wouldn't really be reasonable to expect to see a lot more of Neptune than a tiny dot with (at best) a hint of blue. It's only 2 arc seconds across, less than a quarter the apparent size of Mars at the moment.

With your scope I would be looking at some open and some globular clusters and some of the brighter compact nebulae (like M57, the ring nebula)

With higher magnification, the state of the atmosphere has a big effect on what you see - so you may find your 6mm EP is effective on the moon, but not for dimmer objects. You may actually appreciate the wider view that you can get from a 32mm or a 40mm eyepiece.

Have you checked the collimation of your scope? If your collimation is out, you can find that higher magnifications just don't cut it.
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak, Raffle winner of SW ST80
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
For companionship: Mid Cheshire Astronomical Group.
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Re: New to Astronomy with Heritage 130p

Postby balakm279 » Fri Oct 07, 2016 11:13 am

I will try to get a look into the Nebula during the next clear skies (not for a day or two I think!) I have not checked the collimation but I was just reading a new scope needs to be collimated so I will do that over the weekend and hopefully improve my results
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Re: New to Astronomy with Heritage 130p

Postby Aratus » Fri Oct 07, 2016 5:22 pm

Neptune wouldn't be the object I would recommend to a beginner either. All a barlow will do if give you a bigger dot! Turn your telescope on the Andromeda galaxy or the Owl Cluster for some interesting sights. Take a look at the Pole Star and see if you can see its companion. Check out the stars that make up the constellation of Aries and compare the differences. Do the same with any bright constellation. As Gfamily2 says, the ring nebula, or try out M27, the so-called 'dumbbell' nebula. I've mentioned several double star sessions on the observation forum which might prove interesting.

A new Newtonian telescope shouldn't need collimating, but it might have got knocked in transit. A Newtonian is easy to check, and to correct if it does need adjustment.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
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