Observatories - home

A place to hang out and chat about astronomy

RE: Observatories - home

Postby astropaul » Fri Mar 27, 2009 9:13 pm

Hi Ronmck,

Hi, i have a 2 meter dome observatory at the end of my garden now, had it just over a year. And the reason why i worked my socks off for some time to get the type of setup that i now have, is because (1) i was lucky enough to have room for it and (2) i was really begining to become tired of luging all my gear out side and having to re-set up and align yet again, and once all done, the clowds roll in, so i've risked damaging my scope by carrying it through the house, risked the wall paper and wall corners whilst doing so, all for nothing...No stuff that for a game of soldiers, if you can have a permenant set-up outside and your anything like me then DO IT !! and astronomy for you will be much more enjoyable.

With regards to observing from your loft, i would say it depends on how far you intend on going with astronomy, it wouldnt be worth spending a lot of money on setting everything up in the loft if you intended on getting into serious photography for instance. However, i used to observe from a balcony some years ago when i lived in a flat, and i was really happy as a begining, i am sure i could have taken pictures too the would have been pretty good. Not as good as some of the pictures you might see posted on this site or in magazines, but still very impressive to friends and family. And with the naked eye using upto a medium power eyepiece i would say you'll probably get 90% as good as you could if you were on the ground. But yet again you said that you had better field of view from your loft, so you'll probably be better off there then, unless your happy with your field of view from your garden, in which case go there. Or you feel that you might want to have a better than 90% of what you are able to see, in which case your back to the garden. But dont let anybody tell you that you cant do anything from the loft, because you can do a lot.!!!


Cheers Paul
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RE: Observatories - home

Postby lukeskywatcher » Sat Mar 28, 2009 1:56 am

I am in a wheelchair and found even lugging my little 3.5 inch refractor into the garden a bit of chore not because of the weight but because of the size. Even when taken apart. I had to make 3-4 trips into the house then spend about 30 mins putting it all together again.

By no means impossible but a a real pain in the backside.

The simplest solution was to revert back to binocular astronomy. So i bought my 20X90 bins and a good tripod to mount them on. Now i can be outside and set up within 2 mins.
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RE: Observatories - home

Postby lsc » Sat Mar 28, 2009 6:20 pm

Thanks to all who have contributed, it has been most useful. As I am doing the loft anyway, there is nothing to be lost from giveing it a try. I need to put a window in for light so the kids can use the scalextric, etc. So I might as well give it a go with the scope and if it really is pants, then I hve lost nothing and can go back to the garden.

Ron
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RE: Observatories - home

Postby lukeskywatcher » Sat Mar 28, 2009 10:46 pm

I have 11 old wooden doors sitting on my drive. I have just replaced them with new doors. Today i had an idea to use them to build an Obs. It would be similar in design to the garden fence Obs. Not sure i'm the man for the job though.

P.S.~~~Where is the door?
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RE: Observatories - home

Postby lukeskywatcher » Mon Mar 30, 2009 8:36 pm

[i][b]If the doors are internal doors they will not last outside, fence panels are treated to last. [/b][/i]

Good point. I hadnt thought of that.
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Re: Observatories - home

Postby Kate321 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 11:31 am

Hi I love the suggestions by you guys, Thanks for sharing such informative things.
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Re: Observatories - home

Postby EIZO » Sun Nov 26, 2017 9:29 pm

Here is what I did
Attachments
a.jpg
a.jpg (150.9 KiB) Viewed 595 times
Celestron Edge 8" Evolution, Esprit 120mm triplet, Sky Tee2, WO Binoviewers, 2" and 1.25" eyepieces, ZWO ASI 178MM camera, Neximage 5, Nikon D4s, D810, Nikkor 70-200 F2.8, Nikkor 14-24, Nikkor 70-200, Nikkor 24-120, Sigma 150-600 Sport
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Re: Observatories - home

Postby EIZO » Sun Nov 26, 2017 9:30 pm

finished version
Attachments
a.jpg
a.jpg (78.03 KiB) Viewed 595 times
Celestron Edge 8" Evolution, Esprit 120mm triplet, Sky Tee2, WO Binoviewers, 2" and 1.25" eyepieces, ZWO ASI 178MM camera, Neximage 5, Nikon D4s, D810, Nikkor 70-200 F2.8, Nikkor 14-24, Nikkor 70-200, Nikkor 24-120, Sigma 150-600 Sport
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Re: Observatories - home

Postby Aratus » Mon Nov 27, 2017 11:20 pm

Great! Anything that keeps the wind and stray light away is to be welcomed. I assume each half wall can be lowered as required.
Last edited by Aratus on Thu Nov 30, 2017 11:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
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Re: Observatories - home

Postby EIZO » Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:34 am

The roof lifts off and yes each "fence" panel is hinged so you can have 1 or all down as needed
Celestron Edge 8" Evolution, Esprit 120mm triplet, Sky Tee2, WO Binoviewers, 2" and 1.25" eyepieces, ZWO ASI 178MM camera, Neximage 5, Nikon D4s, D810, Nikkor 70-200 F2.8, Nikkor 14-24, Nikkor 70-200, Nikkor 24-120, Sigma 150-600 Sport
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