Part of beehive cluster with ic2388

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Part of beehive cluster with ic2388

Postby andrewscomputers » Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:28 pm

Hi all I took this image last week of the beehive cluster,my camera has only got part of it as my chip is small on my colour camera.I have managed to capture IC2388 which is 14.7 magnitude according to the information on that I gathered from google.I know my refractor is only supposed to got to 12.7 according to skywatchers website,I thought I would share but is nothing special.I only too 3 images in jpeg at 15 seconds each.Also I have labelled up the dot if that helps.Thanks for looking.
Andy
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beehive copy2.jpg
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beehiveloation.jpeg
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andrewscomputers
 
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Re: Part of beehive cluster with ic2388

Postby Aratus » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:58 pm

The quoted magnitude limit for telescopes is based on visual observation. The great thing about using a CCD or camera is that you can capture much dimmer objects with long exposures. It would be interesting to see how dim a star you can capture. The kind of camera you are using will only give a small part of most deep sky objects. There are smaller targets like planetary nebula and galaxies which will fit in the field of view of your camera.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
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Re: Part of beehive cluster with ic2388

Postby andrewscomputers » Thu Feb 15, 2018 12:25 am

Aratus wrote:The quoted magnitude limit for telescopes is based on visual observation. The great thing about using a CCD or camera is that you can capture much dimmer objects with long exposures. It would be interesting to see how dim a star you can capture. The kind of camera you are using will only give a small part of most deep sky objects. There are smaller targets like planetary nebula and galaxies which will fit in the field of view of your camera.

Hi Aratus thanks for the reply, I will have to give it a go and see how dim a star I can capture.I recently got a Skywatcher 80mm ed as to get more of a wider field of the sky to help looking for deepsky objects.
Andy
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