planets on allwise images

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planets on allwise images

Postby adrian wingham » Fri Apr 22, 2016 10:23 am

hi ya am a budding amateur astronomer have been spending allot of time on sky watch alpha viewing their phenominal images.
my question is are you able to see our solar planets on these images or does the view differ wether being on the ground or being on hubble. i have been searching for jupiter have been following star charts for this time of year but cant seem to pin it down.
is there something im missing :shock:
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Re: planets on allwise images

Postby dave.b » Mon Apr 25, 2016 7:45 pm

Jupiter is currently a bright night time object. An amature telescope will reveal a disk with bands and the four large moons.
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Re: planets on allwise images

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Sun May 15, 2016 9:22 pm

Hubble not only has the advantage of being in space but it is also much larger than nearly all amateur telescopes.

I can see the main equatorial cloud belts and polar "shading" with my 127mm Maksutov. I saw some detail on Mars last night but haven't processed the photos yet.

Saturn sometimes shows detail. Mercury and Venus show phases, like lunar phases and SOMETIMES Venus shows some shading in its clouds.

Uranus and Neptune show as tiny discs in most telescopes. Pluto, Eris and other trans-Neptune objects appear just as a tiny dot indistinguishable from stars. I've never seen any solar system objects further than Neptune.
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

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