M42 Orion nebula with meteor

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M42 Orion nebula with meteor

Postby andrewscomputers » Thu Nov 30, 2017 11:31 pm

Hi all I managed to get these shots last night and managed to get a meteor on one of the images,so thought I would share.Thanks for looking.
Andy
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19.jpg
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16.jpg
meteor trail
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Re: M42 Orion nebula with meteor

Postby Aratus » Thu Nov 30, 2017 11:46 pm

Congratulations on that fantastic detail, especially the last photo. That streak is very short for a meteor trail, and a bit wobbly. You might have caught a geostationary satellite 24,000 miles away. They always give very short trails, as the only apparent movement is the telescope following the target. If that's the case then the 'wobble' is caused by the gearing on the telescope. There are some people who deliberately go looking for them!
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, with an 80mm refractor as a guidescope. They are housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC for imaging.
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Re: M42 Orion nebula with meteor

Postby andrewscomputers » Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:03 am

Hi Aratus thanks for the reply I did wonder what it was,as I captured the image three times in individual shots,thanks for the explanation.I was surprised that I caught it on my camera.
Andy
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Re: M42 Orion nebula with meteor

Postby Gfamily2 » Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:30 am

I had a similar short trail in some images of M27, the Dumbbell Nebula. That was unexpected as M27 isn't near the equator, so it's not the obvious place for an object in a geostationary orbit.

After asking around, it seems likely that it was a satellite in a Molniya orbit - a special type of orbit that is designed to keep the satellite above a specific area of the Earth for high latitude locations (true geostationary orbits only apply at the equator). The Molniya orbit is a type of Tundra orbit, so it's highly elliptical meaning it moves relatively slowly over the 'preferred location' and rapidly traverses the rest of its orbit before getting back in 'position'.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tundra_orbit
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
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Re: M42 Orion nebula with meteor

Postby andrewscomputers » Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:52 am

Gfamily2 wrote:I had a similar short trail in some images of M27, the Dumbbell Nebula. That was unexpected as M27 isn't near the equator, so it's not the obvious place for an object in a geostationary orbit.

After asking around, it seems likely that it was a satellite in a Molniya orbit - a special type of orbit that is designed to keep the satellite above a specific area of the Earth for high latitude locations (true geostationary orbits only apply at the equator). The Molniya orbit is a type of Tundra orbit, so it's highly elliptical meaning it moves relatively slowly over the 'preferred location' and rapidly traverses the rest of its orbit before getting back in 'position'.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tundra_orbit

Hi thanks for the reply and the information.
Andy
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Re: M42 Orion nebula with meteor

Postby Aratus » Fri Dec 01, 2017 5:41 pm

Gfamily2 wrote:I had a similar short trail in some images of M27, the Dumbbell Nebula. That was unexpected as M27 isn't near the equator, so it's not the obvious place for an object in a geostationary orbit.

After asking around, it seems likely that it was a satellite in a Molniya orbit - a special type of orbit that is designed to keep the satellite above a specific area of the Earth for high latitude locations (true geostationary orbits only apply at the equator). The Molniya orbit is a type of Tundra orbit, so it's highly elliptical meaning it moves relatively slowly over the 'preferred location' and rapidly traverses the rest of its orbit before getting back in 'position'.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tundra_orbit

It could well be. Andrew's streak certainly wasn't one of the DBS clusters like Astra or Eutelsat, which show up as multiple streaks, (and the position is slightly wrong) but it might have been a redundant satellite that has been taken off the main belt. Equally it might have been a rocket booster in a very large orbit. With so much stuff up there I'm surprised we don't see more of them than we do
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, with an 80mm refractor as a guidescope. They are housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC for imaging.
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