How do you get fine detail on planets.

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Re: How do you get fine detail on planets.

Postby Aratus » Sun Apr 22, 2018 10:55 pm

It is useful to remember that filters cut down the amount of light. They never brighten anything. However by dimming certain features it can increase the contrast. I have tried for years to see or image features on Venus, but without success. However I still think that observing Venus is interesting but it needs to get near to half phase before it starts to look good. By then it is much bigger. Like this image taken last year.
Image

Unfortunately Venus won't reach half phase this year until Aug 15th. By then it will be heading towards the southern part of the ecliptic, and very low down in the sky. Sadly, it will be even worse the next year! However it will be very well placed in 2020.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
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Re: How do you get fine detail on planets.

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Mon May 07, 2018 8:18 am

I once used sunglasses to reduce the glare of Jupiter and Venus but now use a moon filter instead.
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

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Re: How do you get fine detail on planets.

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Mon May 07, 2018 8:20 am

Also worth mentioning that Venus is still a long way from us. It starts getting more interesting from half phase onwards. I have picked up some cloud top features in photographs when it has been a crescent phase.
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

My website: http://www.philippughastronomer.com/

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
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