Advice Please

Ask your fellow astronomers to solve your telescope queries

Advice Please

Postby Connelly1888 » Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:47 pm

I know this is asked all the time, so apologies in advance

I was interested in astronomy from a young age, and around 10 years ago I bought a pair of 20x80 binos to wet my appetite. I got a good understanding of the night sky and could easily find specific galaxies and areas of interest

Fast forward to now, with a bit more cash in my back pocket I'm looking to get in to the hobby a bit more seriously.

My end goal is astrophotography, so I would be looking to get a basic setup that I can use to reaquaint myself with the night sky at first but will be simple to expand upon to get the right setup to take some decent pictures of planets as well as deep sky objects like galaxies and nebulae.

So first off I'd be happy with a setup just for looking at different things, but as I say, would like it to be able to just add to so I can take good photos of different objects

I already own a dslr (nikon) but would need to purchase everything else.

My starting budget would be around £2-500, basically just a decent telescope to start with, if I need to buy a better mount in the future I'm not too bothered, but would rather stay with the same scope

Thanks in advance
Martin
Connelly1888
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:35 pm

Re: Advice Please

Postby Graeme1858 » Sat Oct 06, 2018 2:53 pm

Hello Martin

Welcome to the forum.

An EQ mount would be the way to go if you're looking to get into astrophotography. An SCT tube gives you a compact setup but the long focal length of these is not ideally suited to deep sky imaging (I'm sure someone will be able to explain why!) so you might want to look at a refracting telescope too.

Regards

Graeme
_______________________________________
Miranda 10x50 Binoculars
Celestron CGX 9.25 SCT
Graeme1858
 
Posts: 158
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2018 2:32 pm
Location: Kent, UK, 51°28’N 0°38’E

Re: Advice Please

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Mon Oct 08, 2018 3:18 pm

You don't need a driven mount, although it helps and gives you as wider range of objects to photograph. Just have a look at this lot:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

About Me: https://www.amazon.com/Philip-Pugh/e/B0034NTCJK

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof
 
Posts: 501
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 1:53 pm
Location: Wiltshire but can be just about anywhere up to 41 000 feet

Re: Advice Please

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Mon Oct 08, 2018 3:29 pm

Sorry, I pressed the wrong button. I would also say get hold of some of the free image processing tools, such as GIMP, Microsoft ICE, Deep Sky Stacker to name just three. You can capture the bright deep sky objects and there's more of them than you think.

The next step might be a Star Adventurer tracker mount (on my wish list).

As for more "serious" stuff don't forget that there are many about with bigger budgets and more experience. If you really want to go down this route, a year or so spent with just your DSLR will do no harm at all.

Alternatively, you may wish to go down the lunar and planetary route, in which case the telescope becomes more important and you need a good "webcam-style" camera.

My own choice is to stay low budget, mainly through "relative" poverty but also because astronomy has to compete with other things for my time and money.

Rather than trying to put you off, I think you need to try a few things out before deciding which way you want to go.

Then there's always solar...
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

About Me: https://www.amazon.com/Philip-Pugh/e/B0034NTCJK

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof
 
Posts: 501
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 1:53 pm
Location: Wiltshire but can be just about anywhere up to 41 000 feet


Return to Equipment Advice

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests