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reflector telescope

Wed Mar 07, 2012 9:26 pm

I have had my first reflector telescope and I am having problems viewing anything other than the moon. When i focus on a planet mars for instance all I can see is the support cross member at the end of my telecsope

Re: reflector telescope

Thu Mar 08, 2012 5:30 pm

Please let us know what model your reflector is and what eyepiece(s) you have tried.

Mars is notoriously difficult at the best of times. I saw it on Saturday and its disc was tiny, even at high magnification. I could see some surface features but the photos showed nothing but a blank disc.

The Moon is always a good object to start with but try Jupiter, as there's more than a fair chance you'll see the equatorial cloud belts and Galilean moons.

Re: reflector telescope

Fri Mar 09, 2012 7:33 pm

Thank you for your reply the make of telescope jessops TA1100-102 reflectiong scope and I was looking through 12.5mm and 20mm lense. This happend when I try to look at anything the only thing I can see clearly is the moon . I do live in a built up area but I am going in back garden and staying out for approx 40 mins before had to let my eyes get used to the dark. Someone at birmingham observatory suggested I try covering my head to stop the light

Re: reflector telescope

Fri Mar 09, 2012 7:38 pm

[quote="Astro Chav"]Please let us know what model your reflector is and what eyepiece(s) you have tried.

Mars is notoriously difficult at the best of times. I saw it on Saturday and its disc was tiny, even at high magnification. I could see some surface features but the photos showed nothing but a blank disc.

The Moon is always a good object to start with but try Jupiter, as there's more than a fair chance you'll see the equatorial cloud belts and Galilean moons.[/quote

thank you for your reply make of telescope is Jessops TA1100-102 reflectiong scope lenses used 12.5mm and 20 mm . I have had it since xmas and the only thing I can see is the moon what ever else i look at the same thing happens. I am using it in the back garden

Re: reflector telescope

Sat Mar 10, 2012 11:08 am

I've done a bit of "digging" by using Google. Sorry to say that it isn't a particularly high specification telescope. The eyepieces supplied are of very low quality (quite a common practice by manufacturers I'm sorry to say). Apparently, a 3x Barlow lens and 6.3mm eyepiece come supplied, too.

If you see the cross-hairs, you are definitely out of focus. To test your focus, aim your telescope at a star and adjust the focus until it becomes a small point. In fact, if you look closely, there will be faint rings surrounding the star, known as Airy discs. Once the star appears as a small point of light you have focus. Next, try Jupiter again and you should see some moons. Not all 4 will always be visible at any one time, as they can be behind, in front of Jupiter or in its shadow. If you fail to see any moons consistently over several nights, you know that something is faulty and you need to talk to the manufacturers.

Over time you can improve the view somewhat by buying better eyepieces. Skywatcher Plossls and Moonfish Group eyepieces are reasonably affordable and aren't too expensive. If you can see some moons around Jupiter and maybe the equatorial belts, you'll certainly see Saturn's rings.

Sorry but I'd forget about Mars for now. It is borderline (at best) in your telescope and you need more experience before tackling it.

There is nothing wrong with looking at the Moon. I still find it fascinating and it is a good place to start when taking photographs.

Another tip: if you don't have any binoculars, get some small ones (say 8x30).

You may find this page useful but it doesn't work on most mobile 'phones:

http://philippugh.fortunecity.com/Directory.html

Re: reflector telescope

Thu Mar 15, 2012 9:33 am

Hi there. Sorry to be a nuscience but I have a similar problem. I have just purchased a Tasco Luminova 114/900 EQ1 reflector but when I look into the eyepiece all I seem to see in the mirror and the cross-beam which holds it in place. The eyepiece is a celestron. Please help as I am getting very frustrated and as a total beguinner, dont want to get so fed up that I stop. Thanks.

Re: reflector telescope

Fri May 11, 2012 5:08 pm

I think all beginners' small astronomical telescopes should be supplied with just one eyepiece - a good (inexpensive) Kellner giving a magnification of about 50X. This is enough to show a wealth of fascinating detail on the Moon - the intricate lunar craters and mountain ranges. Plus tantalising glimpses of planetary discs: Jupiter's cloud-belts, Saturn's rings, a Martian icecap.

And the relatively low power of 50X, with Kellner wide-field, provides glorious views of stellar spectaculars like Orion's Sword, the Pleiades and the Beehive.

All this excites the beginner, and whets the appetite for more advanced views with a bigger telescope!

Whereas, if the first telescope has an eyepiece with a ridiculously high magnification, like 600X on a 4" reflector, the beginner is probably put off by the dim obscure views, and loses interest.

Re: reflector telescope

Thu May 17, 2012 11:25 am

markcoke74 wrote:Hi there. Sorry to be a nuscience but I have a similar problem. I have just purchased a Tasco Luminova 114/900 EQ1 reflector but when I look into the eyepiece all I seem to see in the mirror and the cross-beam which holds it in place. The eyepiece is a celestron. Please help as I am getting very frustrated and as a total beguinner, dont want to get so fed up that I stop. Thanks.


Sorry I didn't reply earlier but I've been busy with my day job and not on forums so much. Your reflector is slightly better than the Jessops but the same advice applies. Next week the Moon will be well placed but Venus is quite well placed just after sunset. Just adjust the focus until you see a thin crescent. It was visible yesterday evening, even in my finderscope.

Re: reflector telescope

Sun May 20, 2012 11:16 am

If what you can see is the secondary mirror and the cross assembly then the focuser is wound out too much. Equally I cannot see how you are able to actually do this as the required travel should be quite a lot, and more then I think a focuser unit should be capable of.

You cannot be seeing the secondary and the moon at the same time, one would obscure the other.

If you are focusing on the moon with one eyepiece getting a view of it, then swapping eyepieces and seeing the secondary, this is beacuse the eyepieces have different focal planes. When you change eyepieces you need to refocus the scope. Sounds as if the 2 eyepieces may have significantly different focal planes, so I suspect they may be different designs.

In simple terms if you are seeing the secondary unit then the eyepiece/focuser needs to be wound inwards.

Re: reflector telescope

Sun Jul 22, 2018 11:22 pm

Hi, I’ve just bought a reflector telescope and I’m having some trouble seeing through it. The telescope is all mounted correctly and the right way but I can only see things behind me rather than in front. Can anyone help? It’s my first time using a telescope so I’m pretty clueless at the moment. Thank you.
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