Rosette Nebula

Re: Rosette Nebula

Postby Aratus » Wed Jan 20, 2016 2:16 pm

Adaptations like this do require a bit of thought if a disaster is to be avoided. I don't mind spending money if that is a good quick solution to a problem, but sometimes a bit of imagination can save a lot of money. I have amassed a large number of 1.25" visual filters which can still be used with photography. For small objects they can be screwed into a 1.25" 'nose' which attaches to the camera and slips into the eyepiece holder. For camera lenses they are similar in size to the glass at the back of the lens. For a telephoto, as you suggested, that element moves backwards and forewards. Care is required to make sure the filter doesn't snag on the lens body, or indeed gets pushed into the camera body.

I have some astro-friends who would never experiment in this way with their valuable camera, but then I would say that using a Canon for astronomical work is experimental anyway.

Are you happy with the clip filters? I know they do a Light Pollution one. What are the others available?
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
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Re: Rosette Nebula

Postby dave.b » Thu Jan 21, 2016 11:13 am

I've got the CLS and clear window clip-filters. The clear window filter sits in the camera for normal use and is intended to keep dust out of the internals when changing lenses. The CLS filter is a light pollution filter for night photography.

They have a range of other filters, such as Ha, OIII, UHC, etc. which are offered with and without IR blocking for cameras that have and have not been modified (respectively). See http://www.astronomik.com/en/clip-filter-system.html. Note that the filters that end with -CCD are for use with modified cameras.

As a tip, I've found that the tab on the filter's storage box makes an excellent tool for releasing the filter from the camera's body, rather than using a finger nail, which is what Astronomik show you to do.

BTW, returning to my previous warning about Canon EFS lenses not being compatible with clip-filters, the reason is that EFS lens' always protrude, by design, into the camera's body. In my limited experience of third party APS lenses for my Canon DSLR, they do not protrude into the camera's body, which is why I can use my clear-window and CLS clip filters with them.

Regards
Dave B.
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Re: Rosette Nebula

Postby Aratus » Mon Jan 25, 2016 7:07 pm

Thanks for that extra information. That's a retailer I've not come across before. I'll enjoy a bit of window shopping there! 8-) I'll remember that advice about the box. My finger nails have never been much use for anything! :oops:

It makes you wonder why the Canon lenses do go into the camera body if it is possible to make them in such a way as to avoid it.

I can't say I'll be buying any of these filters to replace the ones I have, (at the moment) but I think if I bought any new ones I would choose this type. Many thanks for pointing me in that direction.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
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Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: Rosette Nebula

Postby lindseynicole010 » Fri Mar 03, 2017 12:33 pm

thanks
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