Slow moving object 17th December 2017

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Slow moving object 17th December 2017

Postby Mike Cuffe » Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:32 pm

Can anyone help identify the slow moving object I captured on 17th December? The attached star trail image was constructed from about 2 hours of 15 sec exposures taken at 30 sec intervals. I was hoping to capture a few late Geminids meteors, but instead caught the slow moving object at the top right of the image. At first I thought it was a stuck pixel, but it first appears about 1 hour into the session and moved at approximately right angle to the star trails.

I have a couple of videos constructed from the individual jpgs which clearly show the object moving upwards and right to left.

Any ideas?

Edit. It looks like the image hasn't been attached, can anyone help me with attaching the image?
Mike Cuffe
 
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Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2015 8:30 pm

Re: Slow moving object 17th December 2017

Postby Gfamily2 » Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:42 pm

We can't see your attachment, but it could be a satellite in a Molnya orbit - these are used for communication satellites for use at high latitudes, where true Geostationary orbits (that would be above the equator) would be at low altitude.
I imaged one last summer when trying to take photos of the Dumbbell Nebula.
These would be relatively fixed in azimuth, but would move more in altitude.

ETA
New members are restricted in links etc they can include in posts, and images can't be too big, which may explain why it's not being added.
I'm only on my phone so can't do a lot at the moment.
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
For companionship: Mid Cheshire Astronomical Group.
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Re: Slow moving object 17th December 2017

Postby Mike Cuffe » Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:50 pm

I thought the same, but the object moves over a period of about an hour, from what I've seen satellites against star trails are stationary points of light. When I manage to attach the image you'll see what I mean.

Thanks for the heads up on the image, I'll reduce its size and try again.
Mike Cuffe
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2015 8:30 pm

Re: Slow moving object 17th December 2017

Postby Mike Cuffe » Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:58 pm

I reduced it to 500KB then went to the 'Upload Attachment' tab at the bottom of the screen, but it doesn't seem to be attached.
Mike Cuffe
 
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Re: Slow moving object 17th December 2017

Postby Aratus » Sat Jan 06, 2018 3:25 pm

Use 'Full Editor' under the reply box, and then the 'IMG' button on the next screen.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
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Re: Slow moving object 17th December 2017

Postby Mike Cuffe » Sat Jan 06, 2018 4:12 pm

Ok thanks.

So I tried that and this time it told me the file was too big, so I reduced it in size but now it tells me
'Sorry, the board attachment quota has been reached.'

What does that mean?

I'm beginning to lose the will to live :?
Mike Cuffe
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2015 8:30 pm

Re: Slow moving object 17th December 2017

Postby Gfamily2 » Sat Jan 06, 2018 6:21 pm

Mike Cuffe wrote:I thought the same, but the object moves over a period of about an hour, from what I've seen satellites against star trails are stationary points of light. When I manage to attach the image you'll see what I mean.

Thanks for the heads up on the image, I'll reduce its size and try again.

It's true that true Geostationary satellites would be motionless, but they only orbit above the Earth's equator.
Most other 'circular' satellite orbits are much closer to earth, and take a lot less than 24 hours to orbit - so the ISS only takes 90 minutes, hence is seen to travel from West to East taking 5 minutes or so to cross the sky.

These Molnya orbits are inclined to the equator and are highly elliptical so they spend a short amount of time south of the equator at a low altitude, then spend most of their time at high latitude north at the orbit's furthest distance from the Earth.

As for the attachments issue - it has been mentioned before, but we're not sure if the board admin is very active at the moment.
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
For companionship: Mid Cheshire Astronomical Group.
Gfamily2
 
Posts: 375
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2015 10:38 pm

Re: Slow moving object 17th December 2017

Postby Aratus » Sun Jan 07, 2018 2:24 pm

This forum seems to work on automatic rules rather than a human being monitoring it. It sometimes comes to silly conclusions about what is going on! If you wait 24 hours after your last attempt I suspect it will let you post again. I imagine there is a quota for each person per day, and it has interpreted your attempts to post as breaching that. Try to keep images down to about 650 pixels across, since this is in proportion to the web site screen size. Try cropping the image to show only the 'point of interest'.

Please stick with it! ;)
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
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Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: Slow moving object 17th December 2017

Postby Gfamily2 » Sun Jan 07, 2018 10:19 pm

If you can post the image elsewhere online (say on google photos), you may be able to link to it using the [img] tags.
I've had to do that to get my 'Jupiter / Mars conjunction' photo added to my recent post.

Do stay :)
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
For companionship: Mid Cheshire Astronomical Group.
Gfamily2
 
Posts: 375
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2015 10:38 pm


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