Telescopes Telescopes Telescopes

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Telescopes Telescopes Telescopes

Postby jdub7 » Sat Oct 07, 2017 7:43 pm

Getting the right telescope nowadays is harder than ever. You want to make a good investment but it’s very difficult to find showrooms to go and actually pick up and handle some scopes, due to internet sales seeing many astronomy shops closing. So I’m hoping I can find some help! Getting the wrong one could mean I want to upgrade in a few months - I want to make a long term investment. While this will be my first scope ive been interested in astronomy for years and keen to learn using a proper scope.

I’d like something fairly portable which will give me the opportunity to explore the sky, observing deep sky objects & nebulae with clarity, so a Newtonian Reflector would be best I think. I may want the option to add a go-to type accessory but primarily want to learn the skies manually, using the computer God gave me! The option of doing astrophotography would be great too. My budget is around £400, but if the right scope is more then I’ll save up!

I’ve been looking for over a month now and I’m keen on the Orion Starblast 6 or the Orion Astroview 6 - so any opinions on these scopes or any other scopes, particularly any 8” scopes that are fairly portable, would be helpful. Thanks!
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Re: Telescopes Telescopes Telescopes

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Sat Oct 07, 2017 9:30 pm

Gosh, I could write a book on this subject. Hold on a minute, I did!

What you really need is a crystal ball because you never know how your interest is going to develop over the years. If you'd have asked me 10 years ago that my main activity would be leaving a camera outside, hoping to catch a meteor, I would not have believed you.

I'm not sure I would spend your entire budget just yet. Also, using myself as an example, I would not consider an 8" Newtonian as "portable", especially on an equatorial mount. A long-term purchase would be an 80mm Startravel refractor but if you are thinking of spending more of your budget, then the ED version would be better. I have the basic Startravel 80 and the only reasons I don't use it more is that the mount is a bit cream crackered and I have a pair of 15x70 binoculars that has an overlap of use.

I notice that you didn't mention binoculars. Do you have some already? One definition I've heard is that an astronomer is someone who owns a £500 telescope but spends most of their time with a £30 pair of binoculars.
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

My website: http://www.philippughastronomer.com/

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Re: Telescopes Telescopes Telescopes

Postby Aratus » Sat Oct 07, 2017 11:04 pm

There is certainly nothing wrong with a 6" Newtonian, and you can get a lot of visual targets with that. There are plenty of photographic targets in range too. An 8" is obviously better, but as has already been said, they are harder to lug around. I'm afraid that the large telescope, the more difficult they are to move in and out of the house.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
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Re: Telescopes Telescopes Telescopes

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:56 am

Aratus wrote:There is certainly nothing wrong with a 6" Newtonian, and you can get a lot of visual targets with that. There are plenty of photographic targets in range too. An 8" is obviously better, but as has already been said, they are harder to lug around. I'm afraid that the large telescope, the more difficult they are to move in and out of the house.


I get funny looks when I tell people I have 5 telescopes. I agree that there's nothing wrong with a 6" Newtonian. I just think that a small refractor is easier to use and is so portable that I've even carried mine by air. Also, many people with small refractors still continue to use them many years later.

The decision to go for a 6" Newt, 5" Maksutov, 8" Dob, etc, is IMO better made after a few months of using a small refractor.
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

My website: http://www.philippughastronomer.com/

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
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Re: Telescopes Telescopes Telescopes

Postby Aratus » Sun Oct 08, 2017 4:04 pm

The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof wrote:
Aratus wrote:There is certainly nothing wrong with a 6" Newtonian, and you can get a lot of visual targets with that. There are plenty of photographic targets in range too. An 8" is obviously better, but as has already been said, they are harder to lug around. I'm afraid that the large telescope, the more difficult they are to move in and out of the house.


I get funny looks when I tell people I have 5 telescopes. I agree that there's nothing wrong with a 6" Newtonian. I just think that a small refractor is easier to use and is so portable that I've even carried mine by air. Also, many people with small refractors still continue to use them many years later.

The decision to go for a 6" Newt, 5" Maksutov, 8" Dob, etc, is IMO better made after a few months of using a small refractor.


I'm sorry Philip, but my post was a response to the original post about the 6" refractors he was suggesting, not to your reply. I should have hit the 'quote' button to make that clear. :oops:
The points you made about binoculars etc are of course perfectly valid. In the end we are all different, and our cupboards are full of items we bought in the past thinking they would be interesting, but turned out not to be! It is the risk we take.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
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