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The Leo Triplet

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The Leo Triplet

Postby Aratus » Sat May 05, 2018 12:32 pm

Leo is high in the south as it gets dark now. It is home to 3 relatively bright galaxies quite close together. I've had to reset my equatorial wedge, and its taking time to get it tweaked for long exposures, but I managed 11x30sec exposures of each of them.
The first is M65, which looks like a elongated strip of light.
Image

The second is M66, which to me looks like a mottled disk.
Image

The third is much harder to see. NGC3628. In fact this is the first time I've properly observed it. It looks rather like a thin hamburger!
Image

They are all 9th and 10th magnitude so at least a 4" telescope is required to see any kind of shape to them. A smaller telescope may show fuzzy dots. NGC3628 is hard to resolve with even larger telescopes. The main problem is 'contrast' where it helps to have a dark sky.

As I get the mount more accurately aligned I may try a longer exposure.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
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Re: The Leo Triplet

Postby Gfamily2 » Sat May 05, 2018 1:09 pm

Nice results.
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak, Raffle winner of SW ST80
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
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Re: The Leo Triplet

Postby Aratus » Sun May 06, 2018 9:29 am

Many thanks. Amazingly these galaxies are actually a group about 35 million light years away. A fact which that always leaves me stunned whenever I see them. With each showing a different angle to us, it makes a nice group when seen together.

I believe M66 in particular is worth trying to get more detail with. Another challenge is to get all three on to one image. M65 & M66 are easy to stitch together, but NGC3628 is further apart.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
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Re: The Leo Triplet

Postby Gfamily2 » Sun May 06, 2018 6:30 pm

Aratus wrote: I believe M66 in particular is worth trying to get more detail with. Another challenge is to get all three on to one image. M65 & M66 are easy to stitch together, but NGC3628 is further apart.

A friend has imaged all 3 with a TS65 on a Star Adventurer.
It acts as a 440mm lens, so has a wider FOV than your C11.
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak, Raffle winner of SW ST80
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
For companionship: Mid Cheshire Astronomical Group.
(Not a moderator)
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Re: The Leo Triplet

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Mon May 07, 2018 8:08 am

I recently saw NGC3268 for the first time. I potted it in Helios StellarII 15x70 bins that I'm reviewing for Best Binocular Review.
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

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Re: The Leo Triplet

Postby Aratus » Tue May 08, 2018 2:37 pm

Gfamily2 wrote:A friend has imaged all 3 with a TS65 on a Star Adventurer.
It acts as a 440mm lens, so has a wider FOV than your C11.

I imagine that is the best way to do it. Longer exposures would be available that way too.

The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof wrote:I recently saw NGC3268 for the first time. I potted it in Helios StellarII 15x70 bins that I'm reviewing for Best Binocular Review.

That's pretty good for something which has such a low contrast. I think knowing exactly where it is in relation to the other two would help a lot. It must be easy to miss otherwise. I must give it a go with my binoculars.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 843
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
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