Using Celectron Telescope

Got a beginners' question? No matter how elementary, our friendly forum community and magazine writers will answer it.

Using Celectron Telescope

Postby RajM28 » Sun Jan 15, 2017 6:42 pm

Hi,

Recently I have been presented with a "Celestron Astromaster 130 EQ Telescope. I also received one 10 mm and another 20 mm eye piece. Although I can see the stars through both lenses, I cannot see the big moon visible in the sky? What am I doing wrong? Is there are any set up or lenses needed to view the moon? I am a beginner and am frustrated as I could not see the moon through my telescope but can see with the naked eye!!

I am considering joining the local astronomy society but in the mean time any help is appreciated.
Thanks
RajM28
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2017 6:12 pm

Re: Using Celectron Telescope

Postby Gfamily2 » Sun Jan 15, 2017 9:40 pm

RajM28 wrote:Hi,

Recently I have been presented with a "Celestron Astromaster 130 EQ Telescope. I also received one 10 mm and another 20 mm eye piece. Although I can see the stars through both lenses, I cannot see the big moon visible in the sky? What am I doing wrong? Is there are any set up or lenses needed to view the moon? I am a beginner and am frustrated as I could not see the moon through my telescope but can see with the naked eye!!

I am considering joining the local astronomy society but in the mean time any help is appreciated.
Thanks

There shouldn't be any reason why stars can be seen, but not the moon, it should be simply a matter of pointing it in the right direction. :)

You may need to check that the red dot finder is properly aligned with the telescope itself. I find it's best to do this using a terrestrial target - choose something as distant as you can see, maybe a tree or a streetlight. Initially, ignore the finder and move the telescope around until you can get the object centred in the 20mm eyepiece and then the 10mm eyepiece. Then, without moving the telescope itself, adjust the small knobs on the red dot finder so that the red dot is lined up with the object you're looking at.
Once you've got the finder aligned with the main scope, take care not to knock it too much, so you can use the red dot to line up with the moon etc.

I find it's usually best to start with the widest view eyepiece, so start with the 20mm when looking for something, you can then swap to the 10mm if you want more magnification.

Best of luck, and do follow up with your local astro society.
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak, Raffle winner of SW ST80
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
For companionship: Mid Cheshire Astronomical Group.
(Not a moderator)
Gfamily2
 
Posts: 452
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2015 10:38 pm

Re: Using Celectron Telescope

Postby Aratus » Mon Jan 16, 2017 12:06 am

The moon is not as big as you might think. A few millimetres can make the difference between seeing it or not seeing it. You have to use the finder, and that means aligning it as Gfamily2 suggests. If you are still able to use the moon (It is rising rather late now) one trick is to move it in the general direction and see the moonlight shining on the edge of the tube. Move the telescope until the moonlight is shining directly on the mirror, and you will be pretty near. When you have the finder aligned, lock it off tightly. Even the most experienced observer is stuck if the finder isn't right. Let us know how it goes.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 807
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: Using Celectron Telescope

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Sun May 21, 2017 12:21 am

Aratus wrote:The moon is not as big as you might think. A few millimetres can make the difference between seeing it or not seeing it. You have to use the finder, and that means aligning it as Gfamily2 suggests. If you are still able to use the moon (It is rising rather late now) one trick is to move it in the general direction and see the moonlight shining on the edge of the tube. Move the telescope until the moonlight is shining directly on the mirror, and you will be pretty near. When you have the finder aligned, lock it off tightly. Even the most experienced observer is stuck if the finder isn't right. Let us know how it goes.


Finding it in daylight is hard, though. Worth doing as a 130mm 'scope shows almost as much detail during the day. Taking photographs is hard, though.
How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

My website: http://www.philippughastronomer.com/

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Sat Nov 23, 2013 1:53 pm
Location: Wiltshire but can be just about anywhere up to 41 000 feet

Re: Using Celectron Telescope

Postby Aratus » Mon May 22, 2017 12:39 pm

You could use moonlight shining down the tube during the night to position the telescope towards the moon, but of course daylight will completely overpower it during the day. Aligning a finder during the day is best done with a distant object of the horizon. Any nightime object will suffer from low contrast if observed during the day. The exception is probably Venus which some would argue is better observed during the day. The moon can work during the day especially if it has a large phase, high in the sky and in a sky with no haze. The nearer to twilight the better though.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
Posts: 807
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
Location: East Lincolnshire


Return to Ask a silly (astronomy) question

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests