Venus 2017

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Re: Venus 2017

Postby Gfamily2 » Sat Feb 18, 2017 9:10 pm

Aratus wrote:Another fleeting glimpse of Venus around the clouds on the 18th February. Venus is a now a healthy 40 arcsecs across, with a 26% crescent and just about at its brightest. Just for a bit of fun I imaged Mars to the same scale and put it on the same photo. Mars is now about 5 times more distant than Venus.

Image

Nice images. Thanks for sharing
Scopes: Meade 8" SCT, Skywatcher 127mm Mak, Raffle winner of SW ST80
For imaging: Pentax K5, Asda webcam, Star Adventurer (new toy)
For companionship: Mid Cheshire Astronomical Group.
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Re: Venus 2017

Postby Aratus » Thu Mar 09, 2017 5:27 pm

I think we can give up on Mars now, but even Venus is making it hard for us. I've had to shift into the middle of the afternoon to continue observing Venus. She is into a neighbour's tree before it gets dark now.
Venus is now 53 arcsecs across, but the phase is only 9%. A fine sight in even a small telescope. Venus is so far north this time around that she should be visible even when in conjunction with the sun. For the same reason Venus will be both a morning and an evening object on the same day, if you have a good eastern and western horizon. (20th March)

Image
Last edited by Aratus on Wed Jul 26, 2017 6:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
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Re: Venus 2017

Postby andrewscomputers » Thu Mar 09, 2017 5:59 pm

Hi Aratus a nice image.I see what you mean by the limb and in my garden it is going low over the front of my house,so is getting harder to image.
Thks
Andy
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Re: Venus 2017

Postby Aratus » Wed Mar 15, 2017 7:50 pm

Venus is more or less lost to the evening sky. It's only 17 degrees from the sun. While the sun is up, the slightest haze illuminated by the sun lowers the contrast of Venus with the sky. I did manage to find it after a little trouble late in the afternoon. It is now 57 arc secs across, and only a 4% crescent.
Image

My telescope's alignment is preserved, allowing me to find objects in the daytime sky. It is possible to align on the moon during the day when it can be seen. With correctly fitted sun filters it is possible to align on the sun, but you really need to know what you are doing in that case. Even the smallest telescopes can permanently damage an eye if the sun is focused on it. No view of Venus is worth losing an eye. :cry:
Last edited by Aratus on Wed Jul 26, 2017 10:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
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Re: Venus 2017

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Sun Mar 19, 2017 1:17 am

How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

My website: http://www.philippughastronomer.com/

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
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Re: Venus 2017

Postby Aratus » Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:53 pm

Getting those faint 'horns', and getting them nice and sharp isn't easy. (My photo above doesn't show the horns particularly sharp.) The wobbly sky means you need a lot of frames just to get a few good ones. I suggest at least 1000 frames, and no more than 5% of those being stacked.

Unfortunately although Venus has given us a really good evening display this time around, it won't be anything like as good again until the spring of 2020.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
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Re: Venus 2017

Postby The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof » Mon Mar 20, 2017 9:03 pm

How can I be one with the universe when we don't know what 96% of it is.

My website: http://www.philippughastronomer.com/

My blog: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.com/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/philippughastronomer/
The Man with the Corrugated Iron Roof
 
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Re: Venus 2017

Postby Aratus » Tue Mar 21, 2017 6:30 pm

The problem with Venus so close to the sun is that the 'horns' can get lost in the glare. Typically I'm using 50 of the best frames from 2000, and even that doesn't always give the contrast needed. Today, 21st March I had to wait for the wispy high clouds to move away before I could get a chance. Even then the thinness of Venus meant, with the poor seeing conditions, that it looked like an oscilloscope!
Venus is now 59 arcseconds across, and a 2% crescent. It is due north of the sun, and actually rises before the sun, and sets slightly after it, so it is technically a morning and evening object at the same time.

Image

This was taken at 4pm this afternoon.
Last edited by Aratus on Wed Aug 02, 2017 1:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
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Re: Venus 2017

Postby Aratus » Thu Mar 23, 2017 6:46 pm

Venus is now only a 1% crescent and only 9 degrees from the sun. Fortunately the sky this afternnoon was pretty clear of haze or high cloud. I took this at 1552 UT.
Image

While I was observing I moved the telescope over to Mercury. At the moment it has only a 10th of the diameter of Venus in the sky, and is on the other side of the sun. A most unimpressive object in a gibbous phase. Hardly worth imaging, but it is interesting to see the difference between the super-large Venus, and the miniscule Mercury.
Image
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
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Location: East Lincolnshire

Re: Venus 2017

Postby Aratus » Sat Mar 25, 2017 6:29 pm

Venus now at inferior conjunction (25th March). Venus is 9 1/2 degrees from the sun, and hard to distinquish from the bright sunlit sky behind it. I've had to push up the contrast on this image to see it at all well. The sky is really a bright washed out sky blue, not black as this appears. It was taken at about 3pm. Venus will now start to precede the sun in the sky, and in order to see it in the next few weeks, it will mean viewing during the morning to get it in a high sky.
Image
Last edited by Aratus on Wed Jul 26, 2017 6:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I use an 11" Celestron SCT (CPC 1100) on an equatorial wedge, housed in a 2.2m Pulsar observatory. I use a ZWO ASI1600MC and Canon 500D for imaging.
Aratus
 
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Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:17 pm
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