10 mesmerising Milky Way images

A prominent Milky Way stretching over the night sky is one of the most glorious sights on Earth. Here, we present ten of our favourite images of the Galaxy sent to us by astrophotographers.

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Dylan Walton, Charmouth, Dorset, 29 July 2015

Dylan says: "The sky was so dark the night I took this you could see the Milky Way with the naked eye. I couldn't resist capturing this beauty to share with my friends and family at home in Birmingham."

Equipment: Canon EOS 350D DSLR camera, Sky-Watcher Explorer-150P reflector, Sky-Watcher EQ2 mount.


 

Margaret Dixon, Glendale Isle of Skye, 1 August 2016

Margaret says: "On holiday on the beautiful Isle of Skye, I had planned to take advantage of the glorious dark skies of Glendale. The sky was crystal clear and the Milky Way was clearly visible to the naked eye. My favourite area the Cygnus region directly above me, I set up my equipment and was thrilled to get this result."

Equipment: Canon EOS 600D DSLR camera, Samyang 14mm f2.8 lens, Ioptron tracking mount on tripod.


 

Peter Louer, Tenerife, Spain, 25 June 2015

Peter says: "I wanted to get a good image of the Milky Way rising over the Caldera in Teide National Park, Tenerife. For this I needed a reasonable amount of moonlight but without it washing out the sky, so I shot two images; the first a 20 sec exposure to get the Milky Way and the second with an exposure of 90 seconds to get detail in the foreground."

Equipment: Canon EOS 700D DSLR camera, 18-55mm lens set at 18mm.


 

Kevin Lewis, Isle of Anglesey, 11 August 2015 

Kevin says: "The ‘church in the sea’ on Anglesey is perfect for night photography: low light pollution, beautiful foreground interest, peaceful and reasonably accessible. My camera was shooting constantly and it caught early Perseids, tumbling satellites, flares and a stunning display of airglow."

Equipment used: Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR camera, 24-70mm lens.


 

David Moreno Soler, Toledo, Spain, 10 October 2015 

David says: "The landscape is illuminated by the Moon Glow opposite the Milky, making for a pretty picture and highlighting the regions of H-alpha. They are emission lines of the hydrogen spectrum associated with a lot of emission nebulae."

Equipment: Canon EOS 550D DSLR camera, 18mm lens.


 

David Lane, California, US, 6 December 2015

David says: "This is one of the hardest images I have ever captured. At night you can't see the falls from Glacier Point but you can hear it: a distant roar to keep one company in the darkness. The altitude is great for visibility, although some of the greens and yellows are light pollution from the major cities and valley of California."

Equipment: Canon EOS 6D DSLR camera, iOptron iPano mount


 

Ivan Slade, Australian Telescope Compact Array, 13 February 2016 

Ivan says: “I had seen these telescopes online and knew the night skies must be very dark so had been wanting to go for some time. Just as the telescopes reoriented I could see a chance of getting the shot I wanted; the antenna aligning with the Milky Way as if sending out a beam into the cosmos.”

Equipment: Sony A7S MK II camera, Tamron 15-30mm lens, Induro tripod.


 

Brendan Alexander, Doochary, County Donegal, Ireland, 31 July 2016

Brendan says: "The journey over the rocky trail to this vantage point was tricky but well worth the effort. When I arrived at the bog lake I was greeted by the sight of the Milky Way blazing across the sky. The most challenging aspect of capturing this scene was framing it. In the end I was happy with the balance I achieved by including as much as possible of the Milky Way and capture the surrounding landscape."

Equipment: Canon EOS 6D DSLR camera, Sigma 20mm lens.


 

Alex Conu, Cathedral Cove, New Zealand, 1 May 2016

Alex says: "Most people visit Cathedral Cove during daytime. Well, I decided to go there at night and for a good reason. That was my first contact with the southern skies and it was like being reborn from an astronomical point of view."

Equipment: Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR camera, Zeiss Otus 28mm lens.


 

John Nellist, Kessingland Beach, Suffolk, 3 August 2016

John says: "The beach had a good clear horizon to the south, making it ideal for a Milky Way shot at this time of year. I wasn't prepared for the amount of light pollution coming from Southwold, which meant I had to adjust my settings, although I think the orange glow adds something to the image."

Equipment: Nikon D600 DSLR camera, Samyang 14mm lens.


 

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