Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012

All the news from last night's awards ceremony

A
a
-

The 2012 Astronomy Photographer of the Year exhibition opens today


Last night, the world’s best astro imagers were celebrated at the annual Astronomy Photographer of the Year awards ceremony at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. As official media partner of the competition, Sky at Night Magazine was there to report on all the action.

The winners of this year’s competition were announced to a crowd of esteemed guests including Sky at Night presenters Chris Lintott, Pete Lawrence, Paul Abel and impressionist Jon Culshaw.

From emerald green auroras to distant star clusters, the variety of images this year was fantastic, and the judges, including Sky at Night Magazine’s Editor Chris Bramley and Features Editor Will Gater, had a tough time deciding on the winning shots. 

Winners and runners up were announced for all of this year's categories and special prizes including Earth and Space, Our Solar System, Deep Space, Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year, People and Space, Robotic Scope and Best Newcomer.

In the end however, it was an incredibly detailed image of M51, the Whirlpool Galaxy, that provided its creator, Martin Pugh, with the title of overall winner.

Last year’s overall winner, Damian Peach was pleased to recieve highly commended and runner up awards this year, "I was happier with my entries this year as they were both taken from where I live", he said. The acclaimed astro imager also complimented the event, "It’s so great to see astrophotography represented like this", he said.

The winning images can be seen from today in a free exhibition, at the Royal Observatory, which runs until 12 February 2013.


For more information visit www.rmg.co.uk/visit/exhibitions/astronomy-photographer-of-the-year

Like this article? Why not:
Astrophotography on The One Show
previous news Article
Gallery: Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012
next news Article
We use cookies to improve your experience of our website. Cookies perform functions like recognising you each time you visit and delivering advertising messages that are relevant to you. Read more here