The Fireworks Galaxy NGC6946 and Open Cluster NGC6939

NGC6946_NGC6939@010_2012_AT10_TMB130_C450D_QHY9_Terry-Hancock_web-b50264a


Terry Hancock

Fremont, Michigan

A combination of “newly found” data acquired from my backyard observatory in Fremont MI. In 2010 using a TMB130SS 5″ refractor with a modified Canon 450D, consisting of 22 x 15 min sub exposures @ 800 ISO together with data from 2012 using an Astro-Tech AT10RC and a QHY9M CCD, 15 min sub exposures were used. The data sets were registered in Registar to add more detail to The Fireworks Galaxy.

A combination of “newly found” data acquired from my backyard observatory in Fremont MI. In 2010 using a TMB130SS 5″ refractor with a modified Canon 450D, consisting of 22 x 15 min sub exposures @ 800 ISO together with data from 2012 using an Astro-Tech AT10RC and a QHY9M CCD, 15 min sub exposures were used. The data sets were registered in Registar to add more detail to The Fireworks Galaxy.
Total Integration time 11 hours.

Here is a link to the reprocessed data on just The Fireworks Galaxywww.flickr.com/photos/terryhancock/25956368822/in/photost…

18 million Light Years away in between the Constellations of Cepheus and Cygnus lies the colorful Fireworks Galaxy which is somewhat obscured by the dense interstellar matter of our own Milky Way Galaxy, classified as an Intermediate Spiral Galaxy which is in between a Barred and an Unbarred Galaxy and it’s known that over 100 Supernovae have occurred during the last 100 years.

Visible in this image lower right is open cluster NGC6939 also in the constellation Cepheus but in stark contrast to The Fireworks Galaxy’s distance of 18 million light years, NGC 6939 is only 3800 light years distant.

2016-03-29T00:00:00

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