Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea coast glimmers in International Space Station image

A beautiful view of Earth from space, as seen by astronauts on the International Space Station

Earth from space: the Red Sea Coast of Saudi Arabia captured from the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/ESA
Earth from space: the Red Sea Coast of Saudi Arabia captured from the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/ESA

The Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia glimmers through the darkness in this incredible image of Earth from space captured by astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

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The curvature of Earth can be seen in the middle of the image, while at the top the blackness of space stretches onwards, peppered with just a few visible stars.

Facts about the International Space Station

  • 240 astronauts from 19 different nations countries have lived and worked on the Earth-orbiting laboratory, which has been continuously occupied since November 2000.
  • Crews onboard are travelling at 5 miles per second, orbiting Earth roughly once every 1.5 hours.
  • In 24 hours, the ISS makes 16 orbits of Earth and sees 16 sunrises and sunsets.
  • The reason astronauts on the ISS float is not because there is no gravity, but rather because there is gravity. The space station is in constant free-fall, but its orbital position means that it continuously dips beyond Earth’s horizon.
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Image stats

  • Observatory International Space Station
  • Release date 7 May 2020
  • Image credit NASA/ESA