See the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022 winning images

See the winning images from the world's biggest astrophotography competition.

Published: September 15, 2022 at 7:30 pm
Get your £10 Amazon Gift Card when you subscribe to BBC Sky at Night Magazine today!

The winning images of the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 14 competition have been announced by the Royal Observatory Greenwich.

Advertisement

The top prize in the 2022 awards goes to Gerald Rhemann for his image 'Disconnection Event', which shows the tail of Comet Leonard being carried away by the solar wind.

Comet Leonard wowed observers and astrophotographers alike in December 2021, and photographer Rhemann took advantage of its bright appearance in the dark winter skies to capture the shot.

See the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022 shortlist

Disconnection Event © Gerald Rhemann. Tivoli Southern Sky Guest Farm, Khomas, Namibia, 25 December 2021. Overall winner, APY 14. Category: Planets, Comets & Asteroids. Equipment: ASA 12” Astrograph telescope, ASA DDM 85 mount, ZWO ASI6200MM Pro camera, 1076 mm f/3.6, mosaic of two LRGB composite panels, 400-second exposure per panel.
Disconnection Event © Gerald Rhemann. Tivoli Southern Sky Guest Farm, Khomas, Namibia, 25 December 2021.

Rhemann said of his shot: "This award is one of the highlights of my astrophotography work. All the effort that went into making this image a success was worth it."

Melissa Brobby, APY 14 judge and science communicator said: "When I first saw this image of Comet Leonard, I was blown away. This picture of a recent visitor to our Solar System has been captured so beautifully.

"The stars in the background give the comet’s tail a magical appearance. I could stare at this image all day."

The top images from the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 13 competition will be on display at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Credit: National Maritime Museum, London
The top images from the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 14 competition will be on display at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Credit: National Maritime Museum, London

Astronomy Photographer of the Year is the world's biggest astrophotography competition and each year welcomes thousands of entries from imagers across the globe.

The competition is run by the Royal Observatory Greenwich, and this year's winning images will be on display in an exhibition at the National Maritime Museum in London alongside a selection of shortlisted images, opening on Saturday 17 September 2022.

Advertisement

Find out more about the Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition and its accompanying exhibition.

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022 winning images

Planets, Comets & Asteroids (overall winner)

Disconnection Event © Gerald Rhemann. Tivoli Southern Sky Guest Farm, Khomas, Namibia, 25 December 2021. Overall winner, APY 14. Category: Planets, Comets & Asteroids. Equipment: ASA 12” Astrograph telescope, ASA DDM 85 mount, ZWO ASI6200MM Pro camera, 1076 mm f/3.6, mosaic of two LRGB composite panels, 400-second exposure per panel.
Disconnection Event © Gerald Rhemann. Tivoli Southern Sky Guest Farm, Khomas, Namibia, 25 December 2021. Overall winner, APY 14. Category: Planets, Comets & Asteroids. Equipment: ASA 12” Astrograph telescope, ASA DDM 85 mount, ZWO ASI6200MM Pro camera, 1076 mm f/3.6, mosaic of two LRGB composite panels, 400-second exposure per panel.

Skyscapes

Stabbing Into the Stars © Zihui Hu. Nyingchi, Tibet, China, 24 December 2021. APY 14 winner, Skycapes. Equipment: Sony ILCE-7R3 camera, Tamron 150–500mm lens, 150mm f/5.6, 75 x 30-second exposures
Stabbing Into the Stars © Zihui Hu. Nyingchi, Tibet, China, 24 December 2021. APY 14 winner, Skyscapes. Equipment: Sony ILCE-7R3 camera, Tamron 150–500mm lens, 150mm f/5.6, 75 x 30-second exposures

People & Space

The International Space Station Transiting Tranquility Base © Andrew McCarthy. Florence, Arizona, USA, 19 January 2022. APY 14 winner, People & Space. Equipment: Celestron C11 and Explore Scientific AR127 telescopes, iOptron CEM70 mount, UV/IR Cut filter, ZWO ASI174MM and Sony A7 II cameras, 2,800 mm f/10, 0.3-millisecond exposure
The International Space Station Transiting Tranquility Base © Andrew McCarthy. Florence, Arizona, USA, 19 January 2022. APY 14 winner, People & Space. Equipment: Celestron C11 and Explore Scientific AR127 telescopes, iOptron CEM70 mount, UV/IR Cut filter, ZWO ASI174MM and Sony A7 II cameras, 2,800 mm f/10, 0.3-millisecond exposure

Aurorae

In the Embrace of a Green Lady © Filip Hrebenda. Hvalnes, Iceland, 10 April 2021. APY 14 winner, Aurorae. Equipment: Sony ILCE-7RM3A camera, 16 mm f/2.8, ISO 2500 Sky: 5-second exposure Foreground: 20-second exposure
In the Embrace of a Green Lady © Filip Hrebenda. Hvalnes, Iceland, 10 April 2021. APY 14 winner, Aurorae. Equipment: Sony ILCE-7RM3A camera, 16 mm f/2.8, ISO 2500 Sky: 5-second exposure Foreground: 20-second exposure

Galaxies

Majestic Sombrero Galaxy © Utkarsh Mishra, Michael Petrasko, Muir Evenden. Pie Town, New Mexico, USA, 5 May 2021. APY 14 winner, Galaxies. Equipment: ATEO 16" f/3.7 Dreamscope Astrograph Newtonian telescope, Paramount ME II mount, Baader LRGB filter, FLI Proline 16803 CCD camera, 1558 mm f/3.7, 56 x 300-second Lum. exposures (10 hours total exposure), 1x1 binning
Majestic Sombrero Galaxy © Utkarsh Mishra, Michael Petrasko, Muir Evenden. Pie Town, New Mexico, USA, 5 May 2021. APY 14 winner, Galaxies. Equipment: ATEO 16" f/3.7 Dreamscope Astrograph Newtonian telescope, Paramount ME II mount, Baader LRGB filter, FLI Proline 16803 CCD camera, 1558 mm f/3.7, 56 x 300-second Lum. exposures (10 hours total exposure), 1x1 binning

Our Moon

Shadow Profile of Plato's East Rim © Martin Lewis. St Albans, Hertfordshire, UK, 20 April 2021. APY 14 winner, Our Moon. Equipment: Home-built 444 mm Dobsonian Newtonian reflector telescope, home-built Equatorial Tracking Platform mount, Astronomik 642nm IR filter lens, ZWO ASI174MM camera, 12.8 m f/29, multiple 29-millisecond exposures
Shadow Profile of Plato's East Rim © Martin Lewis. St Albans, Hertfordshire, UK, 20 April 2021. APY 14 winner, Our Moon. Equipment: Home-built 444 mm Dobsonian Newtonian reflector telescope, home-built Equatorial Tracking Platform mount, Astronomik 642nm IR filter lens, ZWO ASI174MM camera, 12.8 m f/29, multiple 29-millisecond exposures

Our Sun

A Year in the Sun © Soumyadeep Mukherjee. Kolkata, West Bengal, India, 31 December 2021. APY 14 winner, Our Sun. Equipment: Nikon D5600 camera, Sigma 150–600c lens, Thousand Oaks Filter (White-Light), 600 mm f/6.3, ISO 100, 365 individual exposures (1/80-second to 1/500-second)
A Year in the Sun © Soumyadeep Mukherjee. Kolkata, West Bengal, India, 31 December 2021. APY 14 winner, Our Sun. Equipment: Nikon D5600 camera, Sigma 150–600c lens, Thousand Oaks Filter (White-Light), 600 mm f/6.3, ISO 100, 365 individual exposures (1/80-second to 1/500-second)

Stars & Nebulae

The Eye of God © Weitang Liang. Chilescope, Río Hurtado, Coquimbo Region, Chile, 8 August 2021. APY 14 winner, Stars & Nebulae. Equipment: ASA N20 f/3.8 Newtonian telescope, ASA DDM85 mount, FLI Proline 16803 camera, 500 mm f/3.8, 22.5 hours total exposure
The Eye of God © Weitang Liang. Chilescope, Río Hurtado, Coquimbo Region, Chile, 8 August 2021. APY 14 winner, Stars & Nebulae. Equipment: ASA N20 f/3.8 Newtonian telescope, ASA DDM85 mount, FLI Proline 16803 camera, 500 mm f/3.8, 22.5 hours total exposure

Annie Maunder Prize for Digital Innovation

Solar Tree © Pauline Woolley, using open source data from Solar Dynamic Observatory. APY 14 winner, The Annie Maunder Prize for Digital Innovation. Original images from the AIA 0131 Angstrom channel of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) (1 January 2020 to 1 February 2022). Images inverted then converted to black and white and contrast increased. Warm filter applied to give tree-like feeling.
Solar Tree © Pauline Woolley, using open source data from Solar Dynamic Observatory. APY 14 winner, The Annie Maunder Prize for Digital Innovation. Original images from the AIA 0131 Angstrom channel of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) (1 January 2020 to 1 February 2022). Images inverted then converted to black and white and contrast increased. Warm filter applied to give tree-like feeling.

Sir Patrick Moore Prize for Best Newcomer

The Milky Way bridge across big snowy mountains © Lun Deng. Sichuan China, 21 February 2021. APY 14 winner, Sir Patrick Moore Prize for Best Newcomer. Equipment: Nikon D810 camera, 35 mm f/1.6, ISO 2000, multiple 30-second exposures.
The Milky Way bridge across big snowy mountains © Lun Deng. Sichuan China, 21 February 2021. APY 14 winner, Sir Patrick Moore Prize for Best Newcomer. Equipment: Nikon D810 camera, 35 mm f/1.6, ISO 2000, multiple 30-second exposures.

Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year

Andromeda Galaxy, The Neighbour © Yang Hanwen, Zhou Zezhen. Heishicheng, Kangding, Sichuan, China, 21 February 2021. APY 14 winner, Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year. Equipment: SkyWatcher 150/750P telescope, iOptron CEM70 mount, Antlia LRGB, HYO H-alpha filter, ZWO ASI294MM Pro camera, 750 mm f/5, 17 hours total exposure
Andromeda Galaxy, The Neighbour © Yang Hanwen, Zhou Zezhen. Heishicheng, Kangding, Sichuan, China, 21 February 2021. APY 14 winner, Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year. Equipment: SkyWatcher 150/750P telescope, iOptron CEM70 mount, Antlia LRGB, HYO H-alpha filter, ZWO ASI294MM Pro camera, 750 mm f/5, 17 hours total exposure

Authors

Iain Todd, BBC Sky at Night Magazine
Iain ToddScience journalist

Iain Todd is BBC Sky at Night Magazine's Content Editor. He fell in love with the night sky when he caught his first glimpse of Orion, aged 10.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Sponsored content