Astronomy conjunctions: upcoming events and how to see them

Find out which conjunctions to look for in the night sky over the coming weeks.

Published: March 28, 2022 at 11:14 am
Try BBC Sky at Night Magazine today and save 30%!

Conjunction: what a funny-sounding word it is, yet in the field of astronomy this phenomenon can give us some wondrous night-sky sights, ranging from naked-eye views through to binoculars and even telescopic viewing.

Advertisement

There are usually a few beautiful conjunctions to see in the night sky - or early morning sky for that matter - each month, and below we'll look at some of the best coming up over the next few weeks.

For more conjunctions and stargazing advice, listen to our Star Diary podcast, which reveals what to look out for in the evening and morning skies over the coming weeks.

You can also sign up to the BBC Sky at Night Magazine newsletter for weekly updates on what to see in the night sky.

A conjunction of the moon with Venus and Jupiter, Chanthaburi, Chanthabur, Thailand, 28 November 2019. Credit: Chakarin Wattanamongkol / Getty Images
A conjunction of the moon with Venus and Jupiter, Thailand, 28 November 2019. Credit: Chakarin Wattanamongkol / Getty Images

What is a conjunction in astronomy?

Generally speaking a ‘conjunction’ is the name given to two or more celestial objects close together in the night sky.

The most commonly observed conjunctions involve the Moon, often as a crescent in the evening or morning sky, along with any of the bright planets – Venus, Mercury, Mars, Jupiter or Saturn.

Read more observing guides:

You can also see conjunctions between the Moon and bright stars or even between the planets themselves, so there is quite a range of possible combinations.

Some involve more than two objects, such as when two planets are in conjunction and are joined by the Moon.

There are also times when incredibly close conjunctions set two objects in the same telescope field of view, or in really special cases, show Venus or Mercury transit across the face of the Sun.

You may already have come across the term in astronomy guides, yet if we went by its strictest definition then some events called conjunctions would probably not qualify.

A conjunction of the Moon, Venus, Mars and Spica, Azul, Argentina. Credit: Stocktrek Images/Luis Argerich/Getty
A conjunction of the Moon, Venus, Mars and Spica, Azul, Argentina. Credit:
Stocktrek Images/Luis Argerich/Getty

To be precise: a conjunction is a line-up of at least two celestial objects in the sky relatively close together that share the same Right Ascension (RA) or ecliptic longitude in the sky.

  • RA is the equivalent of longitude on Earth but projected onto the celestial sphere
  • The ecliptic is the plane of Earth’s orbit and appears to us as the apparent path of the Sun across the sky. Ecliptic longitude is measured along the ecliptic eastwards from the spring equinox

Even within astronomy there are different meanings of the word conjunction.

  • When a planet, either outer or inner, lies on the other side of the Sun to Earth it is said to be at superior conjunction
  • When an inner planet lies between Earth and the Sun it is at inferior conjunction
Tony Titchener captured this beautiful image of a crescent Moon and Venus on 27 February 20202, before lockdown began. Tony captured it on 27 February 2020 from Seaford, Sussex, UK using a handheld Nikon Coolpix 520 bridge camera. Credit: Tony Titchener
Tony Titchener captured this beautiful image of a crescent Moon and Venus on 27 February 2020. Tony captured it on 27 February 2020 from Seaford, Sussex, UK using a handheld Nikon Coolpix 520 bridge camera. Credit: Tony Titchener

When do conjunctions occur?

Often a conjunction will occur during daytime or when the objects are below the horizon, and this is where the definition becomes more relaxed.

If the objects are very bright, such as a crescent Moon and Venus, then daylight viewing can be possible, but if the objects have set below the horizon they won’t be visible.

So conjunction can be applied in quite a loose context to refer to objects that are viewable above the horizon in twilight or at night, even if they are not, at that point, at the exact moment of conjunction.

  • If the objects are at their closest, then this is known as an appulse: the minimum separation between two bodies that occurs just before or after true conjunction.

Conjunctions really capture our attention, which makes them ideal targets for public stargazing events, or for inspiring young astronomers and newcomers to look up at the night sky.

They are also easy to capture with a smartphone camera, giving more people the chance to preserve the moment and share with friends or on social media.

For more on this, read our guide on how to photograph a conjunction.

Moon, Venus, Jupiter and Mars Conjunction 8 Oct 2015 by Peter Louer, Tenerife. Equipment: Canon 700D 18-55mm Lens
The Moon, Venus, Jupiter and Mars in conjunction, 8 Oct 2015. Credit: Peter Louer

Upcoming conjunctions to see in the night sky

Below we’ll look at some fascinating conjunctions coming up over the next few weeks between the Moon, planets and stars.

1-2 May: Jupiter & Venus, Mars & Saturn

On 1 Jupiter and Venus are in conjunction and just 22 arc minutes apart but from 2 May they quickly part company. Including Mars and further away Saturn, there are still four planets in the morning twilight to look out for.

Venus is dropping back towards the Sun, but Jupiter continues to improve as it climbs a little higher each passing morning.

Look for them near to the east with Mars in the east-southeast and Saturn roughly southeast at around 4:40am

2 May: Moon, Mercury, Pleiades

The slim crescent Moon lies next to Mercury, with the Pleiades, M45, to Mercury’s right in evening twilight. Look west-northwest around 9:30pm BST.

Over the week Mercury moves away from the Pleiades but both are dropping lower into the ever-brighter evening twilight.

3 March: Mare Crisium

OK so this one isn't a conjunction as such, but if you happen to have your telescope out, there's a great opportunity to see Mare Crisium, the Sea of Crises, around 3 and 4 March, a day after new Moon.

On the 3 March the terminator bisects the sea and then next evening it is fully illuminated.

The sea has a dark floor with several craters that catch the eye. One of these could be of interest to fans of Star Trek as there is a crater called Picard…no, not Jean-Luc but interestingly it is named after Jean Picard, 17th century French Astronomer, a member of the Academy of Sciences in 1666.

6 May: Eta Aquarids

On the morning of 6 May the Eta Aquariid shower peaks. The Moon is in the evening sky so won’t interfere, but although this shower is better seen from the southern hemisphere it is worth looking out for any meteors before dawn.

9 May: Moon, Regulus, Eta Leonis 

The moon is at first quarter this evening and lies above Regulus and close to Eta Leonis. The stars of Leo in this part of the sky look like a backwards question mark and are also collectively known as the Sickle asterism. Check out Gamma Leonis, Algieba as it is a nice golden yellow pair of stars just under 5 arc sec apart.

11 May: Vesta, Saturn, Delta Capricorni, Neptune

Fancy a challenge? Check out the spread of bright planets from Venus to Jupiter to Mars and Saturn in the morning twilight, around 4:11am.

They are not the challenge however: Vesta lies below left of Saturn forming a triangle with Delta Capricorni. For a greater challenge, look for Neptune between Jupiter and Mars.

Both will require binoculars and maybe even a telescope to pick out in the twilight.

13 May: Lunar occultation of Porrima

In the early hours look for the Moon gradually creeping closer to Porrima, Gamma Virginis. By 1:49am it will occult the star for just under an hour with reappearance occurring around 2:42am.

Aways look at least 15 mins before and after the stated times, as times do vary across the UK.

Binoculars or better yet a telescope is best for this, the latter useful as Porrima is a close double star. See if you can spot each component being occulted.

14 May: Lunar occultation of Lambda Virginis

If you like watching occultations then on the evening of 14 May around 10:30pm onwards, watch as Lambda Virginis is occulted. Reappearance occurs around 11:33pm but again, check 15 mins before and after to make sure you don’t miss the start and end.

16 May: Total lunar eclipse

We kick off the week with a lunar eclipse. The Moon is in the morning sky and just reaches total lunar eclipse as it is setting so you will need a clear, uncluttered southwest horizon.

The Moon enters the penumbra at 02:32am, enters the darker umbra part of Earth's shadow at 03:27am and is total at 05:11am. Moonset varies across the UK so some places will see the moon set before it reaches totality.

For more info, read our guide to the 16 May total lunar eclipse.

18 May: Mars, Neptune, Jupiter, Saturn, Venus

Time for another attempt at Neptune in bright morning twilight. Mars and Neptune are in conjunction with Jupiter to their left. Use binoculars to see if you can spot Neptune to the upper left of Mars around 4am over in the east. Saturn is to their right whilst Venus is now getting quite low and lies to the left of Jupiter.

22 May: Moon, Saturn

The last quarter moon lies below Saturn on 22 May to end the week. Look around 4am for them along with Mars, Jupiter and Venus before the Sun rises.

25/26 May: Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Venus

We begin the week once again in the morning sky as this is where the main bright planets currently reside. Look around 4am to catch the Moon on 25 and 26 May, as firstly it lies below Mars and Jupiter to form a nice triangle on 25 May, then it forms a shallow triangle with Jupiter and Venus on 26 May.

27 May: Moon, Venus

This morning the very slim crescent moon lies just below Venus, very low above the horizon around 4am. Look out for earthshine too: this is when you can see the night side of the moon as well as the bright daylit crescent side.

29: May: Mars, Jupiter

Mars and Jupiter will be just over 0.5° apart in the morning sky: effectively you could just about fit the Moon between them. Look towards the east to east-souteast sky around 4am for this gorgeous view. Binoculars will be good as well as a telescope, but you can also view this with the naked eye.

End of May: NLCs

The end of May marks the start of noctilucent clouds season so keep an eye on the northeast to northwest horizon for these night shining clouds. They appear silvery blue and appear roughly an hour or so after sunset towards the northwest horizon.

Images of astronomical conjunctions

Below is a selection of images of conjunctions captured by BBC Sky at Night Magazine readers and astrophotographers.

Advertisement

For advice on imaging the night sky, read our guide to astrophotography, and don't forget to send us your images or share them with us via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Mars Jupiter Conjunction by James Robertson, Lake District, UK. Equipment: Zwo asi120mc-s, Canon zoom lens at 18mm
Mars Jupiter Conjunction by James Robertson, Lake District, UK. Equipment: Zwo asi120mc-s, Canon zoom lens at 18mm
Moon, Venus, Jupiter and Mars Conjunction 8 Oct 2015 by Peter Louer, Tenerife. Equipment: Canon 700D 18-55mm Lens
Moon, Venus, Jupiter and Mars Conjunction 8 Oct 2015 by Peter Louer, Tenerife. Equipment: Canon 700D 18-55mm Lens
Moon, Venus, Jupiter & Mars Conjunction 10 Oct 2015 by Peter Louer, Tenerife. Equipment: Canon 700D, Samyang 10mm Lens
Moon, Venus, Jupiter & Mars Conjunction 10 Oct 2015 by Peter Louer, Tenerife. Equipment: Canon 700D, Samyang 10mm Lens
Moon & Co by Jonathan, London. Equipment: Sony
Moon & Co by Jonathan, London. Equipment: Sony
Planetary Trio Conjunction Venus Jupiter Mars by Martin Marthadinata, Surabaya, E. Java, Indonesia. Equipment: Nikon D5000, 50mm lens
Planetary Trio Conjunction Venus Jupiter Mars by Martin Marthadinata, Surabaya, E. Java, Indonesia. Equipment: Nikon D5000, 50mm lens
Venus Mars and Jupiter by John Brady, W. Lancashire, UK. Equipment: Canon Powershot SX60 IS
Venus Mars and Jupiter by John Brady, W. Lancashire, UK. Equipment: Canon Powershot SX60 IS
Jupiter, Venus, Mercury by Colin Brumfitt, Moreton Beach, Wirral, Merseyside, UK. Equipment: Sony a100, tripod.
Jupiter, Venus, Mercury by Colin Brumfitt, Moreton Beach, Wirral, Merseyside, UK. Equipment: Sony a100, tripod.
Venus, Jupiter, Moon & Mercury by Richard Sass, Cloudcroft, New Mexico USA. Equipment: Nikon D-40, 18mm lens, Tripod
Venus, Jupiter, Moon & Mercury by Richard Sass, Cloudcroft, New Mexico USA. Equipment: Nikon D-40, 18mm lens, Tripod
Jupiter & Moon by Brian.M.Johnson, Hove, UK. Equipment: Canon 50D.
Jupiter & Moon by Brian.M.Johnson, Hove, UK. Equipment: Canon 50D.
Crescent Moon & Jupiter Close Conjunction by Anthony Burley, Redditch, Worcs, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher 150P, Nikon 5100
Crescent Moon & Jupiter Close Conjunction by Anthony Burley, Redditch, Worcs, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher 150P, Nikon 5100
Crescent Moon & Jupiter Close Conjunction by Anthony Burley, Redditch, Worcs, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher 150P, Nikon 5100
Crescent Moon & Jupiter Close Conjunction by Anthony Burley, Redditch, Worcs, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher 150P, Nikon 5100
The Moon and Jupiter Meet by Steve Jarvis, Churwell, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Olympus E410, Celestron 80mm Travelscope.
The Moon and Jupiter Meet by Steve Jarvis, Churwell, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Olympus E410, Celestron 80mm Travelscope.
Christmas Conjunction: Jupiter & Moon by André Gonçalves, Vieira do Minho, Braga, Portugal. Equipment: SkyWatcher 80ED, Canon 1000D
Christmas Conjunction: Jupiter & Moon by André Gonçalves, Vieira do Minho, Braga, Portugal. Equipment: SkyWatcher 80ED, Canon 1000D
Moon and Jupiter by Humberto Cecim, Brazil. Equipment: 114/1000 Reflector Greika, Fujifilm Finepix S2800 HD
Moon and Jupiter by Humberto Cecim, Brazil. Equipment: 114/1000 Reflector Greika, Fujifilm Finepix S2800 HD
Occultation of the Moon and Jupiter by Alastair Willis, Shire of Augusta, Margaret River, Western Australia. Equipment: Nexstar 8se, Olympus FE-100.
Occultation of the Moon and Jupiter by Alastair Willis, Shire of Augusta, Margaret River, Western Australia. Equipment: Nexstar 8se, Olympus FE-100.
46 Hour Old Moon and Jupiter by Brian R Bugler, Worth Matravers, Dorset, UK. Equipment: Canon 5D mk II, 70-200 f2.8L zoom lens.
46 Hour Old Moon and Jupiter by Brian R Bugler, Worth Matravers, Dorset, UK. Equipment: Canon 5D mk II, 70-200 f2.8L zoom lens.
Moon with Jupiter by Philip Pugh, Chippenham, UK. Equipment: Nikon D3200, tripod
Moon with Jupiter by Philip Pugh, Chippenham, UK. Equipment: Nikon D3200, tripod
Moon-Jupiter Conjunction by John Bell, Haversham, Milton Keynes, UK. Equipment: Canon 5D mk2, 200mm f2.8 lens.
Moon-Jupiter Conjunction by John Bell, Haversham, Milton Keynes, UK. Equipment: Canon 5D mk2, 200mm f2.8 lens.
Conjunction of Waning Moon and Jupiter by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 300mm
Conjunction of Waning Moon and Jupiter by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 300mm
Conjunction of Jupiter and Waning Moon by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 300mm
Conjunction of Jupiter and Waning Moon by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 300mm
Moon, Jupiter and Galilean Moons by Steve Brown, Stokesley, N. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 250mm lens, tripod.
Moon, Jupiter and Galilean Moons by Steve Brown, Stokesley, N. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 250mm lens, tripod.
Waxing Moon & Jupiter by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 300mm
Waxing Moon & Jupiter by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 300mm
Jupiter and the Moon in Conjuction by John Foster, Plymouth, UK. Equipment: Nikon D3200, Evostar 102/1000 frac, EQ3 mount.
Jupiter and the Moon in Conjuction by John Foster, Plymouth, UK. Equipment: Nikon D3200, Evostar 102/1000 frac, EQ3 mount.
Planets, Moon and More by Alfredo Balreira, Rio Tinto, Portugal. Equipment: Canon Eos 1000D, Tripod.
Planets, Moon and More by Alfredo Balreira, Rio Tinto, Portugal. Equipment: Canon Eos 1000D, Tripod.
Conjunction over Brisbane by Teale Britstra, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Equipment: Canon 600D, 18-55mm lens
Conjunction over Brisbane by Teale Britstra, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Equipment: Canon 600D, 18-55mm lens
Venus, Jupiter and the Moon by Graham Green, Brighstone, Isle of Wight. Equipment: Canon EOS 600D, Canon EF 14mm lens, Astronomik CLS CCD filter, AstroTrac.
Venus, Jupiter and the Moon by Graham Green, Brighstone, Isle of Wight. Equipment: Canon EOS 600D, Canon EF 14mm lens, Astronomik CLS CCD filter, AstroTrac.
Sunset, Jupiter, Venus and Crescent Moon by Jenny Budden, Wimborne, UK. Equipment: Nikon D200, 18-200 lens.
Sunset, Jupiter, Venus and Crescent Moon by Jenny Budden, Wimborne, UK. Equipment: Nikon D200, 18-200 lens.
The Moon Jupiter & Venus over Tenerife by Peter Louer, Tenerife. Equipment: Canon 700d, 55mm Lens
The Moon Jupiter & Venus over Tenerife by Peter Louer, Tenerife. Equipment: Canon 700d, 55mm Lens
Moon, Venus and Jupiter Rising by Steve Brown, Stokesley, N. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 250mm lens, tripod.
Moon, Venus and Jupiter Rising by Steve Brown, Stokesley, N. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 250mm lens, tripod.
Jupiter - Venus conjunction and Cookham Dean Church by Roger Palframan, Cookham Dean, Berkshire, UK. Equipment: Nikon D300s, 16-85mm (~40mm).
Jupiter - Venus conjunction and Cookham Dean Church by Roger Palframan, Cookham Dean, Berkshire, UK. Equipment: Nikon D300s, 16-85mm (~40mm).
Jupiter and Venus March 2012 by George Zealey, Effingham, Surrey, UK. Equipment: Sony Alpha A390, Sony 18-75mm lens.
Jupiter and Venus March 2012 by George Zealey, Effingham, Surrey, UK. Equipment: Sony Alpha A390, Sony 18-75mm lens.
Conjunction by Mohammad Reza Ghorbanzade, Babol, Iran. Equipment: Fuji Film Finepix S4000.
Conjunction by Mohammad Reza Ghorbanzade, Babol, Iran. Equipment: Fuji Film Finepix S4000.
Dawn conjunction of Venus, Jupiter and the Pleiades by Jonathan Green, North Shore, Auckland, New Zealand. Equipment: Canon 60Da, 28-80mm Canon lens.
Dawn conjunction of Venus, Jupiter and the Pleiades by Jonathan Green, North Shore, Auckland, New Zealand. Equipment: Canon 60Da, 28-80mm Canon lens.
Jupiter/Venus by Baz Pearce, Bolton, UK. Equipment: Celestron Maksutov 127SLT, SPC900 webcam, baader ir/uv cut filter, Astro Engineering 0.6x focal reducer.
Jupiter/Venus by Baz Pearce, Bolton, UK. Equipment: Celestron Maksutov 127SLT, SPC900 webcam, baader ir/uv cut filter, Astro Engineering 0.6x focal reducer.
Venus and Jupiter Conjunction by Michael LaMonaco, United States, New Jersey. Equipment: Celestron 8SE, Advanced VX mount, Canon 60Da, Skyris 445C
Venus and Jupiter Conjunction by Michael LaMonaco, United States, New Jersey. Equipment: Celestron 8SE, Advanced VX mount, Canon 60Da, Skyris 445C
Venus and Jupiter by Allan Payeras, Paraná, Brazil. Equipment: Samsung NX1000, Samsung 20-50mm.
Venus and Jupiter by Allan Payeras, Paraná, Brazil. Equipment: Samsung NX1000, Samsung 20-50mm.
The Conjunction by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Canon 5Dmkii, Canon 70-300L lens
The Conjunction by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Canon 5Dmkii, Canon 70-300L lens
Jupiter & Venus Conjunction by Peter Louer, Tenerife. Equipment: Canon 700D, 18-55mm lens.
Jupiter & Venus Conjunction by Peter Louer, Tenerife. Equipment: Canon 700D, 18-55mm lens.
Evening Star of Venus VS Jupiter by Nazam Anuar, Johor, Malaysia. Equipment: Sony A6000.
Evening Star of Venus VS Jupiter by Nazam Anuar, Johor, Malaysia. Equipment: Sony A6000.
Mars and the Moon by Steve Brown, Stokesley, N. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D.
Mars and the Moon by Steve Brown, Stokesley, N. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D.
Moon, Venus and Mars by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D
Moon, Venus and Mars by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D
Maghery Conjunction by Brendan Alexander, Maghery, Co. Donegal, Ireland. Equipment: Canon EOS 6D, Sigma 20mm lens
Maghery Conjunction by Brendan Alexander, Maghery, Co. Donegal, Ireland. Equipment: Canon EOS 6D, Sigma 20mm lens
Venus, Mercury and Young Crescent Moon by Brendan Alexander, Maghery, Co. Donegal, Ireland. Equipment: Canon 1000D, Tripod
Venus, Mercury and Young Crescent Moon by Brendan Alexander, Maghery, Co. Donegal, Ireland. Equipment: Canon 1000D, Tripod
Occultation of the Moon & Saturn by Zlatko Orbanic, Pula, Croatia. Equipment: Astro Tech 80/480, Canon EOS 600D.
Occultation of the Moon & Saturn by Zlatko Orbanic, Pula, Croatia. Equipment: Astro Tech 80/480, Canon EOS 600D.
Moon and Venes by Ali Matinfar, Mesr desert, Iran. Equipment: Canon 5D MII, 24-105 L f4
Moon and Venes by Ali Matinfar, Mesr desert, Iran. Equipment: Canon 5D MII, 24-105 L f4
Venus, Saturn and Moon Panarama by Richard Scoot, Billericay, UK. Equipment: Canon 450D, 55-200mm Zoom.
Venus, Saturn and Moon Panarama by Richard Scoot, Billericay, UK. Equipment: Canon 450D, 55-200mm Zoom.
Moon Venus Before Sun Rise by Brian.M.Johnson, Hove, UK. Equipment: Canon 50D, Lens.
Moon Venus Before Sun Rise by Brian.M.Johnson, Hove, UK. Equipment: Canon 50D, Lens.
Moon and Venus by Alfredo Balreira, Portugal. Equipment: ED100 Skywatcher, EQ6 mount, Canon 1000D.
Moon and Venus by Alfredo Balreira, Portugal. Equipment: ED100 Skywatcher, EQ6 mount, Canon 1000D.
Crescent Moon & Venus by Colin Foran, Arborfield, Reading, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS 550D, Canon Lens EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6
Crescent Moon & Venus by Colin Foran, Arborfield, Reading, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS 550D, Canon Lens EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6
Moon & Venus Feb 2014 by Fred Connell, Huntley, Gloucesterhire, UK. Equipment: Nikon D70, 75-300 zoom
Moon & Venus Feb 2014 by Fred Connell, Huntley, Gloucesterhire, UK. Equipment: Nikon D70, 75-300 zoom
The Conjunction of Moon & Venus by Zlatko Orbanic, Pula, Croatia. Equipment: Canon EOS 600d, Tamron 18-200mm.
The Conjunction of Moon & Venus by Zlatko Orbanic, Pula, Croatia. Equipment: Canon EOS 600d, Tamron 18-200mm.
Evening Star and Crescent Moon by Oliver Mannion, Canterbury, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS 400D.
Evening Star and Crescent Moon by Oliver Mannion, Canterbury, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS 400D.
Starburst Moon and Venus by Steve Brown, Stokesley, N. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 18-55mm lens, Star Adventurer mount.
Starburst Moon and Venus by Steve Brown, Stokesley, N. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 18-55mm lens, Star Adventurer mount.
Occultation of Venus and Moon by Richard Sass, Cloudcroft, New Mexico U.S.A. Equipment: Nikon D-3200, EQ-3 tripod
Occultation of Venus and Moon by Richard Sass, Cloudcroft, New Mexico U.S.A. Equipment: Nikon D-3200, EQ-3 tripod
Jupiter & Waxing Moon by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 300mm
Jupiter & Waxing Moon by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D, 300mm
Waxing Crescent Moon and Venus by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D.
Waxing Crescent Moon and Venus by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Canon 600D.
The Moon and Venus by David Arundel, Erdington, Birmingham, UK. Equipment: Nikon D3200.
The Moon and Venus by David Arundel, Erdington, Birmingham, UK. Equipment: Nikon D3200.
Moon and Venus - 19th August 2017 by Dilip Sharan, Milton Keynes, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS 1200D, tripod
Moon and Venus - 19th August 2017 by Dilip Sharan, Milton Keynes, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS 1200D, tripod

Authors

Paul Money is an experienced astronomer, BBC Sky at Night Magazine's Reviews Editor and author of the annual stargazing guide Nightscenes.

Sponsored content