Orion: a guide to the Hunter constellation

A guide to the Orion constellation, how to see it and the Hunter's best deep-sky objects.

The Orion constellation. Credit: iStock

There are few constellations that grab the attention quite like that icon of the winter heavens, Orion. The glittering bright stars, the instantly recognisable ‘belt’ and the many glowing nebulae scattered within the Hunter’s boundaries all make Orion a wonder to behold on a frosty, dark night.

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But the constellation is also a rich hunting ground for observers and astrophotographers seeking deep-sky targets.

Constellation of Orion by Zygmunt Szot, Comporta, Portugal. Equipment: Canon PowerShot G7 X, Joby Gorillapod Hybrid Tripod
Constellation of Orion by Zygmunt Szot, Comporta, Portugal. Equipment: Canon PowerShot G7 X, Joby Gorillapod Hybrid Tripod

Orion holds something for everyone, whether you enjoy the naked-eye splendour of its stars, want to tour it with a pair of binoculars, peer deeper with a modest telescope or delve into its deepest and faintest targets with 10- to 14-inch systems.

It is easy to enjoy the view of the Orion Nebula alone, but a host of astronomical treasures awaits those willing to look a little closer.

Below we reveal some of Orion’s most striking features and the equipment needed to see them.

Orion’s Belt

Orions Belt by John Harding, Sheffield, S. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Pentax KR DLSR
Orions Belt by John Harding, Sheffield, S. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Pentax KR DLSR

One part of Orion is particularly recognisable. It comes in the form of just three stars, and is known as Orion’s Belt.

 same colour, quite close together, are virtually the same brightness and form a fairly straight line.

The stars, from east to west, are known by their Arabic names of Alnitak (‘belt’), Alnilam (‘string of pearls’), and Mintaka (‘girdle’).

Just for interest, if you’ve ever seen any of the wonderful images of a gas cloud in space known as the Horsehead Nebula, then it sits in this part of the sky, just below the Belt star Alnitak – although you would need a big telescope to see it.

Observing Orion with the naked eye

Allow 30-40 minutes for your eyes to adapt to the dark before you start observing

Orion by Richard Abels, Rutland, United Kingdom. Equipment: Canon 600D, 18mm lens.
Orion by Richard Abels, Rutland, United Kingdom. Equipment: Canon 600D, 18mm lens.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis)

  • RA: 05h 55m 10s
  • Dec.: +07° 24’ 25”

We begin with the most famous star in Orion, mag. +0.5 Betelgeuse (Alpha (α) Orionis). An unmistakable bright orange star of spectral class M0, Betelgeuse is often cited as the most likely red supergiant to go supernova any time in the next million years.

Rigel (Beta Orionis)

  • RA: 05h 14m 32s
  • Dec.: –08° 12’ 06”

On the opposite side of the Belt stars to Betelgeuse is mag. +0.2 Rigel (Beta (β) Orionis). In contrast to Betelgeuse, Rigel is a brilliant blue-white star of spectral class B8. It is technically a little brighter than Betelgeuse despite being designated Beta.

Betelgeuse and Rigel. Credit: iStock

Observing Orion with binoculars

Delights await you whether you have a pair of 7x42s, 10x50s or 15x70s

Orion’s Belt

  • RA: 05h 36m 12s (Alnilam)
  • Dec.: –01° 12’ 07” (Alnilam)

With 10×50 binoculars you will see a little deeper. The 6° field of view allows a stunning view of the three stars that form Orion’s Belt: mag. +1.9 Alnitak (Zeta (ζ) Orionis), mag. +1.7 Alnilam (Epsilon (ε) Orionis) and mag. +2.4 Mintaka (Delta (δ) Orionis). All 3 are B0 spectral class.

Sword of Orion

  • RA: 05h 35m 16s (Theta1 Orionis)
  • Dec.: –05° 23’ 23” (Theta1 Orionis)

For now let’s sidestep the Orion Nebula, as the sword also contains the wonderful open cluster NGC 1981 at the top. A group of stars including mag. +4.6 42 Orionis and mag. +5.2 45 Orionis sits north of the Orion Nebula (M42) and the adjacent De Mairan’s Nebula (M43), which itself is above mag. +2.8 Hatsya (Iota (ι) Orionis).

Meissa (Lambda Orionis)

  • RA: 05h 35m 8s
  • Dec.: +09° 56’ 03”

Mag. +3.5 Meissa (Lambda (λ) Orionis) is found in a neglected group of stars known as Collinder 69 or the Lambda Orionis Association. Meissa makes a triangle with mag. +4.4 Pi1 (π¹) Orionis and mag +4.1 Pi22) Orionis. Meissa and the cluster it resides in are thought to be 1,100 lightyears away and certainly worth looking at with larger binoculars.

Orion’s Shield

  • RA 04h 49m 50s (Tabit)
  • Dec.: +06° 57’ 40” (Tabit)

Another neglected pattern is that of Orion’s Shield, formed by the 6 stars designated Pi Orionis (mag. +4.6 Pi1, mag. +4.4 Pi2, mag. +3.2 Pi3, mag. +3.7 Pi4, mag. +3.7 Pi5, and mag. +4.5 Pi6). They form a curved line best seen with low-power binoculars, such as a pair of 7x42s, as the distance between the two ends of the shield is 8.5º. Pi33) Orionis, also known as Tabit, is a relatively close 26 lightyears away.

M42 is the most famous member of Orion’s Sword, but by no means the only worthy target. Credit: iStock
M42 is the most famous member of Orion’s Sword, but by no means the only worthy target. Credit: iStock

Observing Orion with a small telescope

Use a reflector up to 6 inches or refractor up to 4 inches and you’ll see more detail

The Orion Nebula

  • RA: 05h 35m 16s (Theta1 Orionis)
  • Dec.: –05° 23’ 23” (Theta1 Orionis)

The Orion Nebula is the showpiece of the constellation and really comes alive with a small refractor. It has two patches with Messier designations: M42 is the main nebula, its wisps and tendrils stretching out from the central Trapezium Cluster. Just above it is the much smaller M43, also known as De Mairan’s Nebula.

M78

  • RA: 05h 46m 45s
  • Dec.: +00° 04’ 45”

M78 would be the showcase nebula of the constellation were it not for the Orion Nebula. It possesses two stars immersed in nebulosity, shines at mag. +8.0 and from Earth looks like a typical white-sheeted ghost. Look out for nearby NGC 2071: it is smaller than its neighbour but shines at mag. +8.0.

NGC 2112 and Barnard’s Loop

  • RA: 05h 53m 45s (NGC 2112)
  • Dec.: +00° 24’ 39” (NGC 2112)

The emission nebulosity described as Barnard’s Loop is well known among astrophotographers, yet part of its section above and slightly east of M78 can be traced with a 6-inch Dobsonian. This faint, ‘milky’ patch curves and ends close to mag. +9.0 open cluster NGC 2112. Low magnification is best for the loop.

Sigma Orionis

  • RA: 05h 38m 44s
  • Dec.: –02° 36’ 00”

Close to mag. +1.9 Alnitak (Zeta (ζ) Orionis) is mag. +4.0 Sigma (σ) Orionis, which appears as a stunning multiple star system through small to medium telescopes. There are four splittable stars, the brightest of which is another double – though this one is too tight to resolve in amateur instruments.

The Flame Nebula (NGC 2024)

  • RA: 05h 41m 55s
  • Dec.: –01° 51’ 00”

The Flame Nebula needs dark skies and low magnification to see well. Use a 6-inch reflector, making sure you keep nearby Alnitak out of the field of view to improve contrast, and you should be able to see its mottled fan shape. As a bonus, reflection nebula NGC 2023 lies nearby.

NGC 1662

  • RA: 04h 48m 27s
  • Dec.: –02° 56’ 38”

Now for something different. NGC 1662 is a lovely mag. +6.4 open cluster forming a right-angle triangle with mag. +4.6 Pi11) Orionis and mag. +4.4 Pi22) Orionis, the two stars at the top of Orion’s Shield. Pi1 Orionis sits in the right angle. This is another overlooked target, said to resemble a Klingon Bird of Prey from Star Trek.

NGC 2022

  • RA: 05h 42m 6s
  • Dec.: +09° 05’ 10”

This little planetary nebula can be found just southeast of mag. +3.5 Meissa (Lambda (λ) Orionis). The nebula shines at mag. +11.6. In a 6-inch Dobsonian it is small and round, appearing a pale greenish-blue. It can sustain high magnification if conditions permit.

The 37 Cluster

  • RA: 06h 08m 24s
  • Dec.: +13° 57’ 53”

Also designated NGC 2169, this cluster gets its name because its stars appear to form the numerals three and seven. A lovely little cluster shining at mag. +5.9 and well worth seeking out even under moderately light-polluted skies. This cluster bears higher magnifications well.

Perhaps the most studied star-forming region in the sky, the Orion Nebula is an easy first target within Orion. Credit: iStock
Perhaps the most studied star-forming region in the sky, the Orion Nebula is an easy first target within Orion. Credit: iStock

Observing Orion with a large telescope

Delve deep into the constellation with a reflector over 6 inches or a refractor over 4 inches

The Trapezium Cluster

  • RA 05h 35m 16s (Theta1 Orionis)
  • Dec.: –05° 23’ 23” (Theta1 Orionis)

At the heart of the Orion Nebula is the Trapezium Cluster. The main stars (A, B, C and D) can be easily seen through small scopes, but use a large instrument and two more pop easily into view: E and F. More challenging are stars G and H, which are mag. +16.0.

Jonckheere 320

  • RA 05h 05m 40s
  • Dec.: +10° 42’ 21”

This is a stunning but neglected planetary nebula shining at mag. +11.8. In smaller telescopes it looks like a green star at low magnification, so larger telescopes really do it justice and bring out its true nature. Through a 14-inch Newtonian it appears as a small green disc.

NGC 1999

  • RA: 05h 36m 25s
  • Dec.: –06° 42’ 58”

This is another nebula that could have more attention if it were not for the Orion Nebula. NGC 1999 shines at mag. +9.5 and in small telescopes looks like a small misty star, but a 14-inch scope reveals the mag. +10.3 star V380 Orionis surrounded by faint nebulosity.

NGC 1788

  • RA: 05h 06m 54s
  • Dec.: -03° 20’ 05”

Off the beaten track and roughly north of mag. +2.8 Cursa (Beta (β) Eridani), NGC 1788 is a reflection nebula that deserves to be better known. It glows by reflecting the light of the mag. +10.0 star embedded within it, and using a large scope reveals more stars around it.

Reflection nebula NGC 1788, abutted on one side by dark nebula Lynds 1616. Credit: Gert Gottschalk, Sibylle Freohlich, Adam Block, NOAO, AURA, NSF.
Reflection nebula NGC 1788, abutted on one side by dark nebula Lynds 1616. Credit: Gert Gottschalk, Sibylle Freohlich, Adam Block, NOAO, AURA, NSF.

NGC 1924

  • RA: 05h 28m 02s
  • Dec.: –05° 18’ 39”

Orion is home to dozens of galaxies. One of the easier ones to find is NGC 1924, which lies to the west of M42, shines at mag. +13.3 and may be as far as 100 million lightyears away. When viewed through a 14-inch Newtonian at 200x magnification it appears as a pale, oval smudge of light.

IC 421

  • RA: 05h 32m 08s
  • Dec.: –07° 55’ 06”

This barred face-on spiral galaxy has a stated magnitude range of mag. +14.2 to mag. +16.4 and is a challenging object. See if you can detect it with a 14-inch Newtonian at 200x magnification as a faint roundish smudge of light. It lies 140 million lightyears away.

UGC 3188

  • RA: 04h 51m 49s
  • Dec.: –08° 50’ 38”

Use mag. +4.4 Pi22) Orionis to home in on this faint galaxy, which rests just 18 arcminutes east of the star and shines at mag. +15.0. This galaxy has a couple of mag. +10.0 stars nearby that help you locate it. Just south of Pi2 Orionis is UGC 3180, another mag. +15.0 galaxy, this time all alone in the night sky.

The Horsehead Nebula (Barnard 33)

  • RA 05h 41m 01s
  • Dec.: –02° 27’ 14”

To see the famous Horsehead Nebula, you have to be able to pick up faint emission nebula IC 434, which hangs south from mag +1.9 Alnitak (Zeta (ζ) Orionis). The horse’s head appears as a dark notch through a 14-inch Newtonian and requires averted vision – a great, subtle challenge.]

How to photograph the Orion constellation

Orion & Betelgeuse Rising by Fred Connell, Huntley, Gloucestershire, UK. Equipment: Nikon D3100 DSLR, 8mm fisheye.
Orion & Betelgeuse Rising by Fred Connell, Huntley, Gloucestershire, UK. Equipment: Nikon D3100 DSLR, 8mm fisheye.

There’s something tremendously evocative about glimpsing the bright stars of Orion over a wintery landscape – or towards the end of the autumn months just as the nights start to get longer and colder.

You can find more astro imaging advice in our guide on how to photograph a constellation.

Equipment

  • DSLR or bridge camera
  • Sturdy photographic tripod
  • A wide kit lens (of the kind that comes with most DSLRs)
  • Portable tracking mount to capture longer exposures (optional)

For help with settings and technical specifications, read our guide on how to use a DSLR camera.

Step-by-step

Make a conceptual plan

How to photograph the Orion constellation.

Thinking about the emotions you want to convey or elicit with your shot can help you to plan a powerful picture, and it’ll inform every stage of the photographic process. This is covered in great detail by Mara Johnson-Groh in her guide to creating artistic astrophotos.

For example, if you wanted to evoke the harsh iciness of winter observing you might shoot Orion over an isolated, leafless tree in a barren landscape, and process in such as way as to create a hard contrast between land and sky.

Select your focal length or a prime lens

How to photograph the Orion constellation.

Once you’ve thought about what atmosphere you want to capture with your image, you can select the focal length you’ll be shooting at.

A typical kit lens set to around 24mm, or an equivalent prime lens, provides a wide field of view for Orion on a camera’s sensor, allowing you to fit in the brighter central stars and the Hunter’s fainter outlying ‘arms’.

Focus the view

How to photograph the Orion constellation.

Next focus the view. Some cameras have a live preview function that can be zoomed onto a suitable star, giving you instant feedback as you make slight focusing adjustments. With Orion there’s no shortage of bright stars that can be used for this.

Repeat the process a few times – checking that the star is a small as possible – so you’re certain the image is as sharp as it can be.

Compose with the landscape and sky conditions

How to photograph the Orion constellation.

To compose your nightscape you can take short, very-high ISO test exposures to show you the balance and positioning of foreground and sky, and any structures or landscape features in frame.

Try to use the foreground – trees, buildings, etc – to lead the viewer’s eye toward Orion. Sometimes clouds can be used as a framing device too, and thin cloud can even ‘bloat’ and enhance the colours of bright stars.

Set exposure length, aperture and ISO

How to photograph the Orion constellation.

When shooting, keep the lens aperture wide open (lowest f-stop), though some lenses will perform better when reduced a few stops. Experiment with the ISO and exposure length until you’re happy with the look.

You may need to use an exposure that very slightly trails the stars in order to define the foreground.

Process your image

How to photograph the Orion constellation.

When processing nightscapes, reducing the noise in the image and bringing out foreground detail are the main challenges. As long as you shoot in RAW format, modern image-processing software is well-equipped to handle these tasks.

In Photoshop or GIMP you can correct the colour balance, and use the ‘Curves’ tool to bring out star fields and improve overall contrast and definition.

For more advice, read our guide to astrophotography image processing.

Photographs of the Orion constellation

Below is a selection of images of the Orion constellation captured by BBC Sky at Night Magazine readers and astrophotographers.

Have you captured an image of Orion? Don’t forget to send us your images or share them with us via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Snowy Orion by Brendan Alexander, Donegal, Ireland. Equipment: Canon 1000D, Tripod
Snowy Orion by Brendan Alexander, Donegal, Ireland. Equipment: Canon 1000D, Tripod
Orion over Farmhouse by Stuart Powell, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Canon 20d, 17-50mm lens @ 17mm f/4, Lightweight tripod.
Orion over Farmhouse by Stuart Powell, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Canon 20d, 17-50mm lens @ 17mm f/4, Lightweight tripod.
Orion nightscape by Brian.M.Johnson, Scottish Highlands, UK. Equipment: Canon 50D, tripod
Orion nightscape by Brian.M.Johnson, Scottish Highlands, UK. Equipment: Canon 50D, tripod
Orion star system by Cliff Tate, Middlesbrough, UK. Equipment: Modded Microsoft Xbox live vision usb cam, FL 7.7mm lens.
Orion star system by Cliff Tate, Middlesbrough, UK. Equipment: Modded Microsoft Xbox live vision usb cam, FL 7.7mm lens.
Orion over the
Orion over the “mans head” at St.Aldhelms Head on the Dorset coast by Brian R Bugler, St.Aldhelms Head, Worth Matravers, Dorset,UK. Equipment: Canon 5D mk III, 24-105L lens.
Orion by Justin Shaw, Gunby, Skegness, UK. Equipment: Sony A230.
Orion by Justin Shaw, Gunby, Skegness, UK. Equipment: Sony A230.
Orion January 30th by Philip Pugh, Chippenham, Wilts, UK. Equipment: Konica Minolta Dynax 5D
Orion January 30th by Philip Pugh, Chippenham, Wilts, UK. Equipment: Konica Minolta Dynax 5D
Orion in the Wembley Arch by John Tipping, Wembley, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS 1100D, Light pollution filter.
Orion in the Wembley Arch by John Tipping, Wembley, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS 1100D, Light pollution filter.
Collinder 72 Lost Jewel of Orion by Mark Griffith, Swindon, Wiltshire, UK. Equipment: GSO 8
Collinder 72 Lost Jewel of Orion by Mark Griffith, Swindon, Wiltshire, UK. Equipment: GSO 8″ Richey-Chretien Optical tube, Skywatcher NEQ6 pro mount, Atik 383L+ camera, motorised filter wheel and Astronomik filters.
Orion over Bude by David Harris, Bude, Cornwall, UK. Equipment: NikonD800, Samyang 14mm f2.8.
Orion over Bude by David Harris, Bude, Cornwall, UK. Equipment: NikonD800, Samyang 14mm f2.8.
Orion, The Hunter by Bill McSorley, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Unmodified Canon 1000D, 18-55mm zoom, SW Star Adventurer Mount
Orion, The Hunter by Bill McSorley, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Unmodified Canon 1000D, 18-55mm zoom, SW Star Adventurer Mount
Barnard loop - M42 - IC434 by David de Cuevas, Treize Vents, France. Equipment: Canon 450D Astrodon, Tamron 17/50mm, CLS EOS Clip Filter, StarAdventurer.
Barnard loop – M42 – IC434 by David de Cuevas, Treize Vents, France. Equipment: Canon 450D Astrodon, Tamron 17/50mm, CLS EOS Clip Filter, StarAdventurer.
The Orion Region by Dave Walker, Forest of Bowland, Clitheroe, UK. Equipment: Modified Canon 60D, EF 24-105mm, Skywatcher HEQ5-Pro.
The Orion Region by Dave Walker, Forest of Bowland, Clitheroe, UK. Equipment: Modified Canon 60D, EF 24-105mm, Skywatcher HEQ5-Pro.
Orion Area v2 by Dave Walker, Forest of Bowland, Clitheroe, UK. Equipment: Modified Canon 60D, Astronomik CLS EOS-Clip, EF 24-105mm, Skywatcher HEQ5-Pro.
Orion Area v2 by Dave Walker, Forest of Bowland, Clitheroe, UK. Equipment: Modified Canon 60D, Astronomik CLS EOS-Clip, EF 24-105mm, Skywatcher HEQ5-Pro.
The Orion Nebula by Ralph Clark, East Rainton, UK. Equipment: DLSR, Skywatcher 250mm Dobsonian.
The Orion Nebula by Ralph Clark, East Rainton, UK. Equipment: DLSR, Skywatcher 250mm Dobsonian.
Orion by Mohammad Bagher Mireskandari, Iran. Equipment: Nikon D7000, Tokona 11-16 f2.8
Orion by Mohammad Bagher Mireskandari, Iran. Equipment: Nikon D7000, Tokona 11-16 f2.8
Dust in Orion by Rafael Silveira Compassi, Presidente Lucena, Brazil. Equipment: Canon T1i, Nikkor 135mm F/2.8, CLS CCD Clip filter
Dust in Orion by Rafael Silveira Compassi, Presidente Lucena, Brazil. Equipment: Canon T1i, Nikkor 135mm F/2.8, CLS CCD Clip filter
Orion's Belt by Davy Cannon, Hamilton, Scotland, UK. Equipment: Altair Astro Starwave 70EDT-R APO refractor, Altair Planostar v2 0.8 focal reducer, Canon EOS 60Da DLSR, Astronomik UHC clip-filter, NEQ6 Pro Mount (unguided).
Orion’s Belt by Davy Cannon, Hamilton, Scotland, UK. Equipment: Altair Astro Starwave 70EDT-R APO refractor, Altair Planostar v2 0.8 focal reducer, Canon EOS 60Da DLSR, Astronomik UHC clip-filter, NEQ6 Pro Mount (unguided).
Orion by Simon Halstead, Earby, Uk. Equipment: Skywatcher 200p, Eq5 Goto Mount , Nikon D3100 14MP.
Orion by Simon Halstead, Earby, Uk. Equipment: Skywatcher 200p, Eq5 Goto Mount , Nikon D3100 14MP.
Belt, Sword, Loop by Graeme Coates, Standlake, Witney, UK. Equipment: modded Canon 350d, Baader filter, Canon 85mm EF lens, DAS P2 filter, Losmandy GM-8.
Belt, Sword, Loop by Graeme Coates, Standlake, Witney, UK. Equipment: modded Canon 350d, Baader filter, Canon 85mm EF lens, DAS P2 filter, Losmandy GM-8.
Orion by Peter Louer, North Tenerife. Equipment: Canon 650D Astro Modified, Canon 50mm lens, IDAS LP1 filter, Star Adventurer mount
Orion by Peter Louer, North Tenerife. Equipment: Canon 650D Astro Modified, Canon 50mm lens, IDAS LP1 filter, Star Adventurer mount
Whitelee Wind Farm by Davy Cannon, Eaglesham, Scotland, UK. Equipment: Canon 80D DSLR, Samyang 14mm f/2.8 lens
Whitelee Wind Farm by Davy Cannon, Eaglesham, Scotland, UK. Equipment: Canon 80D DSLR, Samyang 14mm f/2.8 lens
The Constellation of Orion by Mark Large, Colchester, UK. Equipment: Astro modified Canon EOS 6d, Samyang 135mm lens, Star Adventurer mount, Manfrotto telephoto lens support, Manfrotto tripod.
The Constellation of Orion by Mark Large, Colchester, UK. Equipment: Astro modified Canon EOS 6d, Samyang 135mm lens, Star Adventurer mount, Manfrotto telephoto lens support, Manfrotto tripod.
Orion the Hunter by Martin Pyott, St Andrews, UK. Equipment: IOptron Smart EQ Pro mount, Baader/Cooled Canon 600D, Canon 18-55mm lens.
Orion the Hunter by Martin Pyott, St Andrews, UK. Equipment: IOptron Smart EQ Pro mount, Baader/Cooled Canon 600D, Canon 18-55mm lens.
Orion from Atacama desert by Yuri Beletsky, Atacama, Chile. Equipment: Nikon D810a
Orion from Atacama desert by Yuri Beletsky, Atacama, Chile. Equipment: Nikon D810a
Ribbon of Fire In Orion (Sh2-276, M78 & LDN 1622) by Terry Hancock, Whitewater, Colorado, USA. Equipment: QHY367C, Takahashi FSQ 130 APO Refractor @ F5, Paramount ME
Ribbon of Fire In Orion (Sh2-276, M78 & LDN 1622) by Terry Hancock, Whitewater, Colorado, USA. Equipment: QHY367C, Takahashi FSQ 130 APO Refractor @ F5, Paramount ME
Orion Molecular Cloud Complex by Daniel Cameron, Galloway Forest Dark Sky Park, Scotland, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS 60Da, Canon EF 40mm F/2.8 lens, SkyWatcher Star Adventurer mount
Orion Molecular Cloud Complex by Daniel Cameron, Galloway Forest Dark Sky Park, Scotland, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS 60Da, Canon EF 40mm F/2.8 lens, SkyWatcher Star Adventurer mount
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This article originally appeared in the December 2016 issue of BBC Sky at Night Magazine.