Supermoon 2021: see the first of the year on 27 April

When is the next supermoon, why do they occur and what does the term supermoon mean? Find out when 2021's supermoons will take place.

A supermoon rising behind a mountain. Credit: Mimi Ditchie Photography / Getty Images

The first supermoon of 2021 will occur on 27 April. It will be the first of three consecutive supermoons this year, making it an ideal time to discuss this often-misunderstood phenomenon and separate fact from fiction.

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The full Moon on 27 April occurs in the early hours, 12 hours ahead of perigee: the point in the Moon’s orbit where it’s closest to Earth. This perigee full Moon appears a little brighter and larger than an average full Moon, and is known by some as a ‘supermoon’.

Some are calling this supermoon a ‘pink supermoon’, but you shouldn’t expect the Moon to be a different colour. The name comes from the practise of naming the different full Moons that occur throughout the year.

The Snow Moon, for example, is the full Moon in February, and April’s full moon is the Pink Moon, named after the pink flowers known as phlox that bloom in spring.

Generally speaking, however, astronomers don’t tend to use these terms (likely a result of the term supermoon’s astrological origins), and the technical name for a ‘supermoon’ is a perigee syzygy Moon.

Supermoon Over Central Illinois, by Joshua Rhoades. Equipment: Canon 6D with Sigma 100-400mm lens at 400mm, ISO400, 1/120s. The first full moon (and supermoon) of 2018 rising over Elkhart Hill and the surrounding fields in Central Illinois.
Supermoon Over Central Illinois, 1 January 2018, by Joshua Rhoades. Equipment: Canon EOS 6D DSLR camera, Sigma 100-400mm lens. Credit: Joshua Rhoades

What is a supermoon and when do they occur?

A supermoon happens when a full Moon coincides with the Moon’s closest approach to Earth along its orbit.

We get 12 or 13 full Moons each year but, due to the orientation of the Moon’s orbit, not every full Moon is a supermoon, in the same way that not every full Moon is a lunar eclipse.

The Moon’s orbit around Earth

The Moon takes just over 27 days to orbit Earth on an elliptical path that takes it from its most distant point from Earth at apogee, to its closest approach at perigee.

These distances can vary between 406,712km (apogee) and 356,445km (perigee).

It also takes just over 29 days to cycle from one full Moon to the next, which you can see for yourself if you note the phases of the Moon night after night.

Meanwhile, Earth’s orbit around the Sun takes 365 days and this means it takes 14 lunar cycles (411 days) to go from one full perigee Moon to the next one.

Going the distance: a comparison between April’s perigee (closest) and apogee (farthest) Moons. Credit: Alamy Stock Photo
Comparison between the perigee (closest) and apogee (farthest) Moons. Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

When does a supermoon happen?

The term supermoon refers to both perigee full and new Moons but, as the new Moon is not visible we will concentrate on the full supermoon.

The name ‘supermoon’ was first coined by astrologer Richard Nolle in 1979. He defined it as “a new or full Moon that occurs when the Moon is at or near (within 90% of) its closest approach to Earth in its orbit”.

Supermoon engulfed by clouds in Clacton-On-Sea, Essex, UK, captured by Shantelle Robinson with an Olympus E-420. Credit: Shantelle Robinson
Supermoon engulfed by clouds in Clacton-On-Sea, Essex, UK, captured by Shantelle Robinson with an Olympus E-420. Credit: Shantelle Robinson

Astronomers prefer the more precise, though perhaps less catchy, term of a perigee full Moon to describe a full Moon that occurs when the Moon’s centre is less than 360,000km from the centre of Earth.

Or a perigee syzygy full Moon, where syzygy refers to a straight-line configuration of three or more celestial bodies in a gravitational system (in this case Earth, the Moon and the Sun).

The opposite phenomenon, an apogee syzygy full Moon, is similarly dubbed a ‘micromoon’.

The difference in apparent size between apogee and perigee full Moons.
The difference in apparent size between apogee and perigee full Moons.

Each full Moon has been given a name by various cultures over time, which you can see in our quick guide to 2021’s supermoons below:

When is the next supermoon?

Supermoons in 2021:

  • Monday 27 April 2021 Super Pink Moon
  • Wednesday 26 May 2021 Super Flower Moon: also a ‘Blood Moon’ due to a lunar eclipse in Australia, western America and Southeast Asia.
  • 24 June 2021 Super Strawberry Moon

Is a supermoon really much bigger?

A perigee full Moon (left) appears 30% brighter and 14% larger than an apogee full Moon (right). Credit: Pete Lawrence
A perigee full Moon (left) appears 30% brighter and 14% larger than an apogee full Moon (right). Credit: Pete Lawrence

Much has been written about supermoons ‘stunning’ and ‘dazzling’ observers, and this is another reason some astronomers balk at the term.

In reality, a full Moon at perigee appears only 14% larger due to being closer to us, and only 30% brighter than an apogee full Moon.

A supermoon is also only about 7% larger and 15% brighter than an average full Moon.

Without a side-by- side comparison, it is difficult to spot the difference from one month to the next, but it is possible to record changes in the Moon’s size through photography.

The difference in brightness is due to the reflected light from the lunar surface that reaches Earth being inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

The Moon illusion

Claims that the Moon appears larger than this are likely to be due to the ‘Moon illusion’. Indeed, the Moon does appear much larger when observed near the horizon at moonrise and moonset.

The reason for this optical illusion is still under debate, but is likely to do with the way our brains process objects close to the horizon as being larger when in proximity to buildings and trees, than when they are high in the sky with nothing to compare sizes against.

A Being 737 silhouetted against the supermoon of 14 November 2016, captured by Richard Matthews from Staffordshire, UK. Credit: Richard Matthews.
A Boeing 737 silhouetted against the Supermoon of 14 November 2016, captured by Richard Matthews from Staffordshire, UK. Credit: Richard Matthews.

Do supermoons always come in threes?

April 2021 brings the first of three consecutive supermoons this year, but this is not unusual.

Indeed, every 14 lunar months the series of full Moons cycles from largest to smallest and back again as the Moon orbits Earth. Perigee can last between two and five full Moons.

For a full Moon to be classed as ‘super’ it must occur when it is around 360,000km away from Earth or less, so the full Moons occurring either side commonly also fall within the supermoon category.

On rare occasions we get two or four supermoons in a row, but three is the most common.

Gallery: 7-8 April 2020 supermoon