Hubble views a supernova in a spiral galaxy

An exploding star has been spotted by the Hubble Space Telescope in a galaxy 70 million lightyears away.

Supernova SN2018gv, spotted by the Hubble Space Telescope in galaxy NGC 2525, 70 million lightyears away. Credit: credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Riess and the SH0ES team / Acknowledgment: Mahdi Zamani

The Hubble Space Telescope has observed a supernova in a spiral galaxy 70 million lightyears away. The galaxy, known as NGC 2525, is in the Southern Hemisphere constellation Puppis, and the bright supernova can be seen as a blue flash on the left side of this image.

Advertisement

Supernovae are stellar explosions caused when stars over 1.4 times the mass of our Sun begin to use up their fuel towards the end of their life. The star collapses in a matter of seconds and explodes as a supernova (for more info, read our guide What is a supernova?)

The supernova pictured here is known as SN2018gv and was first spotted in January 2018. Supernovae like these can be used to measure distances in space, enabling astronomers to calculate the expansion rate of the Universe.

More Hubble images:

Image stats

Release date 1 October 2020

Observatory Hubble Space Telescope

Advertisement

Image credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Riess and the SH0ES team / Acknowledgment: Mahdi Zamani