Jupiter’s Galilean moons

Facts about and images of Jupiter's four largest satellites, the Galilean moons.

An illustration showing Jupiter and its four Galilean moons, from left to right Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto. Credit: NASA/JPL/DLR

Jupiter’s four largest moons Io, Callisto, Europa and Ganymede are known as the Galilean moons because the first recorded observation of the moons was by Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei in 1610.

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The Galilean moons are fascinating worlds. Ganymede, for example, is the largest moon in the Solar System. Io is the most volcanically active world in the Solar System, its volcanoes having been discovered by planetary scientist Linda Morabito during the Voyager mission.

The shadow of moon Io projected onto Jupiter. Image credit: Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS Image processing by Kevin M. Gill, CC BY 3.0
The shadow of moon Io projected onto Jupiter. Image credit: Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
Image processing by Kevin M. Gill, CC BY 3.0

Europa is an icy moon with a subsurface ocean lurking beneath its frozen crust, much like Saturn’s moon Enceladus. As a result, it’s one of the best places in the Solar System to search for conditions that could support life.

Callisto is the third largest moon in the Solar System, after Saturn’s moon Titan, and may be considered by some to be the lifeless, characterless member of the four Galilean moons.

However, there is evidence that Callisto too hosts a subsurface ocean. Could it be another contender for life-supporting conditions beyond Earth?

Images of Jupiter's moon Ganymede captured on 26 December 20198 showing infrared mapping of its North Pole. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/ASI/INAF/JIRAM
Images of Jupiter’s moon Ganymede captured on 26 December 2019 showing infrared mapping of its North Pole. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/ASI/INAF/JIRAM

How did the Galilean moons form?

It is thought that  Jupiter’s largest moons Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto most probably formed out of material leftover from the formation of Jupiter itself.

Like the rest of the Solar System planets, Jupiter formed out of the disc of dust and gas surrounding the young Sun. Once this gas and dust had condensed to form Jupiter, the leftover material coalesced and grew over time to form the Galilean moons.

This makes Jupiter’s largest moons likely as old of the rest of the Solar System: about 4.5 billion years old.

A Hubble Space Telescope image of Europa showing suspected plumes of water vapour erupting at the 7 o'clock mark. These plumes could be evidence of a subsurface ocean below Europa's icy crust. Credits: NASA/ESA/W. Sparks (STScI)/USGS Astrogeology Science Center
A Hubble Space Telescope image of Europa showing suspected plumes of water vapour erupting at the 7 o’clock mark. These plumes could be evidence of a subsurface ocean below Europa’s icy crust.
Credits: NASA/ESA/W. Sparks (STScI)/USGS Astrogeology Science Center

Observing the Galilean moons

The Galilean moons are also a favourite target of astronomers because it is possible to view them around Jupiter, provided you have a big enough telescope.

If you know when and where to look, you may be able to see transits of the moons passing Jupiter, spot their shadows cast on the gas giant’s surface, or even an occultation.

Find out more about observing the Galilean moons.

Facts about the Galilean moons

Io

A mosaic of the Galileo probe’s highest resolution images of Io, captured on 3 July 1999. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
A mosaic of the Galileo probe’s highest resolution images of Io, captured on 3 July 1999. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
  • Diameter: 3,660km
  • Mass: 0.015 Earth masses
  • Orbital distance: 421,800km
  • Equatorial circumference: 11,445.5km
Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system, hosting hundreds of volcanoes that are kept active by the gravitational interactions between the moon, Jupiter, and fellow Jovian satellites Europa and Ganymede.
It has a highly elliptical orbit, and tidal forces generated through its interaction with Jupiter generate a fierce amount of heat that causes molten lava to spew from volcanoes, filling surface impact craters.
Jupiter’s magnetic field strips material from Io’s surface, producing a cloud of radiation around the volcanic moon.
As a result of all these processes, Io is an incredibly dynamic world, and perhaps one of the oddest looking moons in the Solar System.
According to Linda Morabito, when Voyager scientists got their first glimpse of Io, they described it as looking like ‘mouldy pizza’.

Europa

This view of Europa shows long linear cracks crisscrossing across the surface of the icy moon. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institut
This view of Europa shows long linear cracks crisscrossing across the surface of the icy moon. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institut
  • Diameter: 3,122km
  • Mass: 0.008 Earth masses
  • Orbital distance: 670,900km
  • Equatorial circumference: 9,807km
The smallest of the moons, Europa is an icy world known to have a liquid ocean beneath its 15-25km thick icy crust, which may contain twice as much as all of Earth’s oceans combined.
This makes it a promising place to search for life, and this is exactly what upcoming missions JUICE – JUpiter ICy moons Explorer – and Europa Clipper will be doing.
Images of Europa reveal long, linear fractures and rusty red-brown material that could be salty, sulphuric compounds that have mixed with water ice and been blasted by radiation.
Its surface is young, potentially as young as 40 million years old, which is evinced by the very small number of craters that can be seen.
Studies using the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed that Europa might actually be venting water from its subsurface ocean out into space, which would be prime targets for future missions to explore Europa, just like the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn’s moon Enceladus.

Ganymede

A view of Ganymede captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft during its flyby on 7 June 2021. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI
A view of Ganymede captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft during its flyby on 7 June 2021. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI
  • Diameter: 5,268km
  • Mass: 0.025 Earth masses
  • Orbital distance: 1,070,400km
  • Equatorial circumference: 16,532km

Ganymede is quite a specimen. It’s the largest moon in the Solar System and the only moon orbiting the Sun with its own magnetic field. As a result it has aurorae at its north and south poles.

It is thought to have a large rocky core covered with layers of ice and water, which show signs of tectonic activity.

The surface of Ganymede seems to have two types of terrain: dark cratered areas and lighter terrain sporting cracks and grooves.

These grooves can stretch 700 metres high and could be a result of tensional faulting, or it could be that Ganymede has a subsurface ocean that’s releasing water into space.

Callisto

An image of Jupiter's moon Callisto: the only complete global colour image of the moon obtained by the Galileo spacecraft. It was captured in May 2001. Credit: NASA/JPL/DLR
An image of Jupiter’s moon Callisto: the only complete global colour image of the moon obtained by the Galileo spacecraft. It was captured in May 2001. Credit: NASA/JPL/DLR
  • Diameter: 4,821km
  • Mass: 0.018 Earth masses
  • Orbital distance: 1,882,700km
  • Equatorial circumference: 15,144km

Callisto is Jupiter’s second largest moon and perhaps the dark horse of the Galilean satellites. It seems to be a geologically inactive, dark, cratered world, but planetary scientists believe it could host a liquid ocean beneath its surface.

That’s not to diminish what’s going on at the surface, however. Callisto’s surface is about 4 billion years old – a result of its geological inertness – and thought to be the oldest, most cratered surface in the Solar System.

The bright spots that pepper Callisto’s surface might well be water ice, frozen on the peaks of its many craters.

Callisto’s subsurface ocean could be interacting with a layer of rocks 250km deep, and oxygen has been detected in the moon’s exosphere.

Could Callisto be a key player in the search for life in the Solar System?

The discovery of the Galilean moons

A fresco by Giuseppe Bertini portraying Galileo showing the Doge of Venice how to use a telescope. Credit: Giuseppe Bertini / http://www.gabrielevanin.it/S.Marco1609.htm / http://www.gabrielevanin.it/Bertini.jpg
A fresco by Giuseppe Bertini portraying Galileo showing the Doge of Venice how to use a telescope. Credit: Giuseppe Bertini

 

On the title page of Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius (Sidereal Messenger) – the first astronomical work based on telescope observations when it was published in 1610 – the author says that the book introduces the reader to “great and surpassingly wondrous sights… observed by Galileo Galilei, Florentine patrician and public mathematician at the University of Padua… in four planets revolving with remarkable speed at differing distances and periods around the star Jupiter.

“They have been known to no one up to this day, and the author was the first to discover them. He has decided to call them the Medicean planets.”

The initial naming of the moons as the Medicean planets was to acknowledge the patronage he received from Grand Duke Cosimo II de’ Medici of Tuscany (1590–1621), whom Galileo had served as mathematics tutor in 1605.

Galileo’s first idea was to name the newly discovered moons the Cosmica Sidera (Cosmian Stars) solely in honour of his patron, but ultimately chose a name that honoured all four surviving Medici brothers: Cosimo, Francesco, Carlo and Lorenzo.

A view of Jupiter and its moon Europa captured on 25 August 2020 by the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M. H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley) and the OPAL team.
A view of Jupiter and its moon Europa captured on 25 August 2020 by the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit:
NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), and M. H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley) and the OPAL team.

Galileo also recognised that the four objects he had observed through his telescope were the first ever seen to orbit another planet, and the importance of his discovery was not lost on him.

But though he may have been the first to name them, Galileo’s claim to having been the first to see them has come under some doubt.

It has been suggested that the Chinese astronomer Gan De, who carried out some of the earliest known systematic observations of the planets in the 4th century BC, may have seen Ganymede.

It was while he was studying Jupiter during the summer of 365 BC that Gan De recorded what he described as a ‘small reddish star’ next to the planet.

The Chinese astronomy historian Xi Zezong (1927-2008) suggested this may have been an early sighting of Ganymede.

An infrared image of the Southern Hemisphere of Jupiter’s moon Io, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft on 16 December 2017. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/ASI/INAF/JIRAM
An infrared image of the Southern Hemisphere of Jupiter’s moon Io, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft on 16 December 2017. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/ASI/INAF/JIRAM

It is theoretically possible to see the Galilean moons with the naked eye, but it requires near perfect conditions and incredible eyesight.

In 1614, around four years after Sidereus Nuncius was published, German astronomer Simon Marius (1753-1625) published his work Mundus Iovialis (1614) in which he described the planet Jupiter and its moons.

He laid claim to having discovered them in December 1609.

This would mean that Marius had spotted the Jovian moons some time before Galileo who, according to Sidereus Nuncius, had first seen them on 7 January 1610.

However, what is certain is that Galileo was the first to publish what he saw.

It was on that date that Galileo turned his telescope towards Jupiter and noticed what he described as “three little stars… positioned near (Jupiter) – small but yet very bright” and noting the presence of a fourth ‘little star’ a few days later.

Although his first thoughts were that these were ‘fixed stars’, Galileo was sufficiently intrigued by the fact they were “arranged exactly along a straight line and parallel to the ecliptic” to continue his observations, which ultimately revealed their true nature.

An illustration showing Jupiter and its four Galilean moons, from left to right Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto. Credit: NASA/JPL/DLR
An illustration showing Jupiter and its four Galilean moons, from left to right Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto.
Credit: NASA/JPL/DLR

After announcing the moons in Sidereus Nuncius, independent verification and sightings of the newly discovered Jovian moons came from a number of sources.

These included such noteworthy observers as Johannes Kepler in Prague, English astronomer Thomas Harriot and French astronomer Joseph Gaultier de La Vallette.

Regardless of who saw them first the mythological names by which these satellites are known today are those given them by Marius (inspired by a suggestion from Johannes Kepler).

In 1614, he wrote in Mundus Iovialis, “Io, Europa, the boy Ganymede and Callisto greatly pleased lustful Jupiter.”

However, the names didn’t gain favour until the early 20th century, mainly because Galileo refused to use them.

In the meantime, they were generally referred to as Jupiter I, II, III and IV according to their closeness to Jupiter.

It would be another few centuries until Jupiter’s next moon, Amalthea, was discovered by American astronomer Edward Emerson Barnard using the 36-inch Great Lick Refractor at Lick Observatory on 9 September 1892.

Amalthea holds the distinction of being the last planetary satellite to be discovered by direct visual observation.

The sixth Jovian moon, Himalia, was revealed on 3 December 1904 using astrophotography, as have all of its many subsequently discovered moons.

Photos of Jupiter and its Galilean moons

Below is a selection of images of Jupiter and its four largest moons captured by astrophotographers and BBC Sky at Night Magazine readers.

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For advice on photographing Jupiter, read our guide on how to photograph the planets. If you do manage to capture Jupiter and its Galilean moons, be sure to send us your images or share them with us via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Jupiter & Galilean Moons by Danny Lee, Kent, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher 150p, EQ5 PRO GOTO, Nikon D40.
Jupiter & Galilean Moons by Danny Lee, Kent, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher 150p, EQ5 PRO GOTO, Nikon D40.
Callisto, Europa, Jupiter, Io and Ganymede by David Duff, Stockton on Tees, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher Explorer 150P, Microsoft HD Cinema Lifecam.
Callisto, Europa, Jupiter, Io and Ganymede by David Duff, Stockton on Tees, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher Explorer 150P, Microsoft HD Cinema Lifecam.
Europa Transits Jupiter by Daniel Mortimer, Leeds, UK. Equipment: 8
Europa Transits Jupiter by Daniel Mortimer, Leeds, UK. Equipment: 8″ reflector, HEQ5 pro, 2x Barlow, 3x Barlow, DFK 21AU04.AS
Jupiter and Moons by Alan Stewart, Glenrothes, Fife, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS400D, Skywatcher 150PL
Jupiter and Moons by Alan Stewart, Glenrothes, Fife, UK. Equipment: Canon EOS400D, Skywatcher 150PL
Jupiter with Io by Stuart Powell, Leeds, UK. Equipment: SW ED80 pro, EQ5 with RA and dec motors, SP880 webcam, 2 2x barlow lenses
Jupiter with Io by Stuart Powell, Leeds, UK. Equipment: SW ED80 pro, EQ5 with RA and dec motors, SP880 webcam, 2 2x barlow lenses
Transit of Europa on November 4th 2011, Imaged from Cornwall by David C Billington, St Agnes, Cornwall, UK. Equipment: 12
Transit of Europa on November 4th 2011, Imaged from Cornwall by David C Billington, St Agnes, Cornwall, UK. Equipment: 12″ US Orion Dobsonion, Watch house Equatorial tracking Platform, SPC880 webcam, 2x Barlow.
Europa Transiting Jupiter on 04.11.11 by Ralph Smyth, Lisburn, Co. Antrim. Equipment: Celestron C8 SCT, Revelation x2.5 ED Barlow, Philips Webcam, IR Filter.
Europa Transiting Jupiter on 04.11.11 by Ralph Smyth, Lisburn, Co. Antrim. Equipment: Celestron C8 SCT, Revelation x2.5 ED Barlow, Philips Webcam, IR Filter.
Jupiter with Ganymede by Brian S Parker, Wales, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher Ed Refractor, 2x Powermate, Philips Webcam, EQ6 Pro Mount
Jupiter with Ganymede by Brian S Parker, Wales, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher Ed Refractor, 2x Powermate, Philips Webcam, EQ6 Pro Mount
Jupiter with Moons by Thomas Davison, Blackdown Hills, UK. Equipment: Phillips SPC900nc, 130mm reflector, 2x Barlow
Jupiter with Moons by Thomas Davison, Blackdown Hills, UK. Equipment: Phillips SPC900nc, 130mm reflector, 2x Barlow
Jupiter and Moons 03/12/11 by Joseph Broadhurst, Telford, Shropshire, UK. Equipment: Meade LX90 8in, SPC900 Web Cam, IR Filter, Registax 6
Jupiter and Moons 03/12/11 by Joseph Broadhurst, Telford, Shropshire, UK. Equipment: Meade LX90 8in, SPC900 Web Cam, IR Filter, Registax 6
Jupiter with Europa and Ganymede by Brian S Parker, Acrefair, Wales, UK. Equipment: 100mm Ed Refractor, 2x Powermate, NEQ6 Mount, Philips Modded Webcam.
Jupiter with Europa and Ganymede by Brian S Parker, Acrefair, Wales, UK. Equipment: 100mm Ed Refractor, 2x Powermate, NEQ6 Mount, Philips Modded Webcam.
Transit of Io by Martin Reeve, Yeovil, Somerset, UK. Equipment: Eyepiece projection with a video camera, Celestron CPC800
Transit of Io by Martin Reeve, Yeovil, Somerset, UK. Equipment: Eyepiece projection with a video camera, Celestron CPC800
Jupiter with Io and Europa 13/11/2011 by Mark Shaw, Boston, UK. Equipment: Helios 200mm reflector, SPC900 webcam, 3 x Televue barlow.
Jupiter with Io and Europa 13/11/2011 by Mark Shaw, Boston, UK. Equipment: Helios 200mm reflector, SPC900 webcam, 3 x Televue barlow.
Jupiter by Andrew Laing, Northamptonshire, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher 200p, HEQ5, DMK21AF04.AS
Jupiter by Andrew Laing, Northamptonshire, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher 200p, HEQ5, DMK21AF04.AS
Jupiter and Moons by Alan Fennah, Wirral, UK. Equipment: Orion-Optics 200mm, Philips SPC900NC Webcam.
Jupiter and Moons by Alan Fennah, Wirral, UK. Equipment: Orion-Optics 200mm, Philips SPC900NC Webcam.
Jupiter and 2 Moons by Colin Miles, LLannon, Wales, UK. Equipment: Philips SPC900NC webcam, Celestron NexStar 6SE
Jupiter and 2 Moons by Colin Miles, LLannon, Wales, UK. Equipment: Philips SPC900NC webcam, Celestron NexStar 6SE
Jupiter with 4 Moons by Tom Davison, Somerset, UK. Equipment: Orion XT10i, Phillips adapted webcam
Jupiter with 4 Moons by Tom Davison, Somerset, UK. Equipment: Orion XT10i, Phillips adapted webcam
Mono image of Jupiter & 3 Moons by Richard, Kettering, Northamptonshire, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher 200P, 3X Barlow, QHY5-II camera.
Mono image of Jupiter & 3 Moons by Richard, Kettering, Northamptonshire, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher 200P, 3X Barlow, QHY5-II camera.
Close up of Ganymede by Simon Rowland, Ponteland, Northumberland. Equipment: Skywatcher 200p Newtonian HEQ5, two 2x Barlows, SPC900NC webcam
Close up of Ganymede by Simon Rowland, Ponteland, Northumberland. Equipment: Skywatcher 200p Newtonian HEQ5, two 2x Barlows, SPC900NC webcam
Jupiter, Europa and Ganymede by Stuart Powell, Leeds, UK. Equipment: EQ5 mount with motors on both axis, SkyWatcher 200p, Revelation 2.5x APO Barlow, SkyWatcher 2x Barlow body without lens between 2.5x Barlow and camera, DBK21AU618 - no filters.
Jupiter, Europa and Ganymede by Stuart Powell, Leeds, UK. Equipment: EQ5 mount with motors on both axis, SkyWatcher 200p, Revelation 2.5x APO Barlow, SkyWatcher 2x Barlow body without lens between 2.5x Barlow and camera, DBK21AU618 – no filters.
Jupiter and Moon in Transit by Jonathan Hall, Hexham, Northumberlad, UK. Equipment: canon eos 550D, revelation t-adapter, skywatcher 127 mak, sywatcher 2x barlow and my laptop for processing and remote capture.
Jupiter and Moon in Transit by Jonathan Hall, Hexham, Northumberlad, UK. Equipment: canon eos 550D, revelation t-adapter, skywatcher 127 mak, sywatcher 2x barlow and my laptop for processing and remote capture.
Jupiter with Moons by Alex Speed, Bedford, UK. Equipment: Celestron 127 Mak, SPC900 webcam, 2x Barlow
Jupiter with Moons by Alex Speed, Bedford, UK. Equipment: Celestron 127 Mak, SPC900 webcam, 2x Barlow
Jupiter and Europa by Tom Howard, Crawley, Sussex, UK. Equipment: Celestron Skyris 618C camera, Celestron C11 SCT, EQ6 mount.
Jupiter and Europa by Tom Howard, Crawley, Sussex, UK. Equipment: Celestron Skyris 618C camera, Celestron C11 SCT, EQ6 mount.
Jupiter and Moons by Tracey Amhof, Okehampton, Devon, UK. Equipment: Canon SX50 with tripod
Jupiter and Moons by Tracey Amhof, Okehampton, Devon, UK. Equipment: Canon SX50 with tripod
Jupiter, Io and Callisto by Jim Thurston, London, UK. Equipment: Celestron 9.25
Jupiter, Io and Callisto by Jim Thurston, London, UK. Equipment: Celestron 9.25″ SCT, EQ6, DMK21 mono CCD, RGB filters.
Jupiter and its Moons by Bill McSorley, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Celestron 5se, QHY5L-ii CCD, Celestron 2x Barlow.
Jupiter and its Moons by Bill McSorley, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Celestron 5se, QHY5L-ii CCD, Celestron 2x Barlow.
Jupiter and Io by Bill McSorley, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Celestron 5se, QHY5L-ii CCD, Celestron 2x Barlow.
Jupiter and Io by Bill McSorley, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Celestron 5se, QHY5L-ii CCD, Celestron 2x Barlow.
Jupiter and Three Moons by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Celestron 8SE, Canon 6D
Jupiter and Three Moons by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Celestron 8SE, Canon 6D
Jupiter and her Moons by Chris Price, Cedartown, GA. USA. Equipment: SkyWatcher ED100 APO, Celestron CG-5 Advanced GT, Canon T3i
Jupiter and her Moons by Chris Price, Cedartown, GA. USA. Equipment: SkyWatcher ED100 APO, Celestron CG-5 Advanced GT, Canon T3i
Jupiter and Io by Alastair Woodward, Derby, UK. Equipment:Skywatcher 6
Jupiter and Io by Alastair Woodward, Derby, UK. Equipment:Skywatcher 6″ Newtonian, HEQ5 mount, QHY5L-II.
Jupiter 9th Feb 2015 by Michael Andrews, Essex, UK. Equipment: 11in SCT, ASI120MM-S RGB Filters
Jupiter 9th Feb 2015 by Michael Andrews, Essex, UK. Equipment: 11in SCT, ASI120MM-S RGB Filters
Jupiter and three Moons by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Celestron 8 SE, 8-24 Hyperion eyepiece, 2 x Barlow, Canon 70D
Jupiter and three Moons by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Celestron 8 SE, 8-24 Hyperion eyepiece, 2 x Barlow, Canon 70D
Jupiter, Io and Europa by Bill McSorley, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Celestron 5se, QHY5L-ll OSC planetary camera.
Jupiter, Io and Europa by Bill McSorley, Leeds, UK. Equipment: Celestron 5se, QHY5L-ll OSC planetary camera.
Jupiter and one Moon by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Celestron 8SE, 8-24mm Hyperion, 2x Barlow, Canon 70D.
Jupiter and one Moon by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Celestron 8SE, 8-24mm Hyperion, 2x Barlow, Canon 70D.
Jupiter and her Moons by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Canon 70D, Celestron 8SE, CGEM DX mount, 8-24mm hyperion, 2 x Barlow
Jupiter and her Moons by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Canon 70D, Celestron 8SE, CGEM DX mount, 8-24mm hyperion, 2 x Barlow
Jupiter and Two Moons by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Hyperion 8-24mm, 2x Barlow Eyepiece projection, Canon 70D, Celestron 8SE
Jupiter and Two Moons by John Short, Whitburn, Tyne and Wear, UK. Equipment: Hyperion 8-24mm, 2x Barlow Eyepiece projection, Canon 70D, Celestron 8SE
Jupiter, Europa & Ganymede by Fayçal Demri, Algiers, Algeria. Equipment: CGEM DX1100, Barlow x2, DFK 51AU02.AS camera
Jupiter, Europa & Ganymede by Fayçal Demri, Algiers, Algeria. Equipment: CGEM DX1100, Barlow x2, DFK 51AU02.AS camera
Jupiter - Io in Transit by Mark Whitcutt, Newport, Wales, UK. Equipment: Orion Star Shoot Solar Imager IV, Skywatcher Evostar 120mm Refractor, Equatorial Mount.
Jupiter – Io in Transit by Mark Whitcutt, Newport, Wales, UK. Equipment: Orion Star Shoot Solar Imager IV, Skywatcher Evostar 120mm Refractor, Equatorial Mount.
Jupiter with two Moons by Gavin James, Marlborough, UK. Equipment: Celestron EdgeHD 800, 2x Powermate, ASI120-MC-S.
Jupiter with two Moons by Gavin James, Marlborough, UK. Equipment: Celestron EdgeHD 800, 2x Powermate, ASI120-MC-S.
Jupiter and two Moons by Daniel Orchard, Melksham, Wiltshire, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher explorer 200p, EQ5 mount unguided Ra motor driven, Laptop
Jupiter and two Moons by Daniel Orchard, Melksham, Wiltshire, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher explorer 200p, EQ5 mount unguided Ra motor driven, Laptop
Jupiter, Io and Ganymede - 19/12/2015 04:40 by Houssem Ksontini, Tunisia. Equipment: Skywatcher 150/750, Neq3-2, Barlow x3, Logitech C270
Jupiter, Io and Ganymede – 19/12/2015 04:40 by Houssem Ksontini, Tunisia. Equipment: Skywatcher 150/750, Neq3-2, Barlow x3, Logitech C270
Jupiter, Io, Europa and Ganymede on New Years Day by Harvey Scoot, Essex, UK. Equipment: C14 Edge HD, ASI 224 cam at F27.
Jupiter, Io, Europa and Ganymede on New Years Day by Harvey Scoot, Essex, UK. Equipment: C14 Edge HD, ASI 224 cam at F27.
Jupiter & Galilean Moon by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Prime focus single shot, Canon 600D attached to Maksutov 127mm telescope
Jupiter & Galilean Moon by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Prime focus single shot, Canon 600D attached to Maksutov 127mm telescope
Jovian System by John Chumack, USA. Equipment: C8 at Prime focus, QHY5IIL CCD.
Jovian System by John Chumack, USA. Equipment: C8 at Prime focus, QHY5IIL CCD.
Double Transit of Ganymede and Io over Jupiter by Houssem Ksontini, Tunis, Tunisia. Equipment: Skywatcher 150/750, Neq3-2, Barlow x3, Webcam Logitech C270
Double Transit of Ganymede and Io over Jupiter by Houssem Ksontini, Tunis, Tunisia. Equipment: Skywatcher 150/750, Neq3-2, Barlow x3, Webcam Logitech C270
Jupiter and Io Moon by Ronald Piacenti Junior, Norma Observatory, Brasilia-DF, Brazil. Equipment: Celestros C6, Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro mount, ZWO ASI120MC CCD.
Jupiter and Io Moon by Ronald Piacenti Junior, Norma Observatory, Brasilia-DF, Brazil. Equipment: Celestros C6, Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro mount, ZWO ASI120MC CCD.
Jupiter & Galilean Moons by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Prime focus single shot, Canon 600D, Maksutov 127mm telescope
Jupiter & Galilean Moons by Sarah & Simon Fisher, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK. Equipment: Prime focus single shot, Canon 600D, Maksutov 127mm telescope
Callisto Transit with Io by Harvey Scoot, Essex, UK. Equipment: C14 Edge Hd, ASI 224MC coloured cam, Pierre Astro ADC.
Callisto Transit with Io by Harvey Scoot, Essex, UK. Equipment: C14 Edge Hd, ASI 224MC coloured cam, Pierre Astro ADC.
Callisto Transit with Io Close by Harvey Scoot, Essex, UK. Equipment: C14 Edge HD, Mesu Mount, ZWO 224 Coloured cam at F20, Pierre Astro ADC
Callisto Transit with Io Close by Harvey Scoot, Essex, UK. Equipment: C14 Edge HD, Mesu Mount, ZWO 224 Coloured cam at F20, Pierre Astro ADC
Jupiter, Io, Ganymede & Europa by James, Ferndown, Dorset, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher Black Diamond Ed100, Heq5pro Mount, Zwo 120mc
Jupiter, Io, Ganymede & Europa by James, Ferndown, Dorset, UK. Equipment: Skywatcher Black Diamond Ed100, Heq5pro Mount, Zwo 120mc
Jupiter, Ganymede and Io by Paul Cotton, Lincolnshire, UK. Equipment: Celestron C9.25, Skywatcher NEQ6 pro, Televue x2 barlow, Baader L RGB filters, ZWO ASI120mm camera
Jupiter, Ganymede and Io by Paul Cotton, Lincolnshire, UK. Equipment: Celestron C9.25, Skywatcher NEQ6 pro, Televue x2 barlow, Baader L RGB filters, ZWO ASI120mm camera
Jupiter with 5 Large Satellites by Tony Titchener, Seaford, Sussex, UK. Equipment: 10
Jupiter with 5 Large Satellites by Tony Titchener, Seaford, Sussex, UK. Equipment: 10″ reflector, Dobsonian mount, Canon 20Da, 5″ refractor.
Jupiter by Stephen Heliczer, Hertfordshire, UK. Equipment: Celestron Evolution 8, Barlow, ZWO ASI 120MC CCD, Firecap.
Jupiter by Stephen Heliczer, Hertfordshire, UK. Equipment: Celestron Evolution 8, Barlow, ZWO ASI 120MC CCD, Firecap.
Jupiter and Callisto by Tom Howard, Crawley, Sussex, UK. Equipment: Celestron C11 SCT, Celestron Skyris 618C camera, Skywatcher AZ-EQ6 mount.
Jupiter and Callisto by Tom Howard, Crawley, Sussex, UK. Equipment: Celestron C11 SCT, Celestron Skyris 618C camera, Skywatcher AZ-EQ6 mount.
Wide Field View of Jupiter and Galilean moons by James Harrop, Gomersal, W. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Skymax pro 180, Canon 6D.
Wide Field View of Jupiter and Galilean moons by James Harrop, Gomersal, W. Yorkshire, UK. Equipment: Skymax pro 180, Canon 6D.
The Moons of Jupiter II by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C14 Edge, ASI 224, Powermate 2X, L filter
The Moons of Jupiter II by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C14 Edge, ASI 224, Powermate 2X, L filter
The moons of Jupiter by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C14 Edge, ASI 224, Powermate 2X, L filter
The moons of Jupiter by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C14 Edge, ASI 224, Powermate 2X, L filter
Jupiter Animated by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C8, ASI 224, Powermate 2X, L filter
Jupiter Animated by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C8, ASI 224, Powermate 2X, L filter
Ganymede on Medium Seeing by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C14 Edge, ASI 224, Powermate 2,5X, L filter.
Ganymede on Medium Seeing by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C14 Edge, ASI 224, Powermate 2,5X, L filter.
Jupiter and Europa from the UK by Harvey Scoot, Essex, UK. Equipment: C14 Edge HD, ZWO224MC CCD, Pierre Astro ADC.
Jupiter and Europa from the UK by Harvey Scoot, Essex, UK. Equipment: C14 Edge HD, ZWO224MC CCD, Pierre Astro ADC.
Ganymede, March 25 by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C14 Edge, ASI 224, Powermate 2,5X, L filter.
Ganymede, March 25 by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C14 Edge, ASI 224, Powermate 2,5X, L filter.
Ganymede in IR 685nm by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C14 Edge, ASI 224, Powermate 2,5X, IR Pass 685.
Ganymede in IR 685nm by Avani Soares, Parsec Observatory, Canoas, Brazil. Equipment: C14 Edge, ASI 224, Powermate 2,5X, IR Pass 685.